Here, two types of cells in the cerebellum are shown: glia and Purkinje neurons. The cells can be distinguished because of a method that relies on the body’s immune system and its antibodies — proteins that recognize and latch onto “foreign substances.” Biologists now use antibodies to reveal where certain proteins are found in the brain. Here, red is an antibody staining of a protein that’s found in glia cells, while green reveals a protein called IP3, of which Purkinje neurons are chockfull.

Here, two types of cells in the cerebellum are shown: glia and Purkinje neurons. The cells can be distinguished because of a method that relies on the body’s immune system and its antibodies — proteins that recognize and latch onto “foreign substances.” Biologists now use antibodies to reveal where certain proteins are found in the brain. Here, red is an antibody staining of a protein that’s found in glia cells, while green reveals a protein called IP3, of which Purkinje neurons are chockfull.

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