This video, by artist Isao Hashimoto, plots every nuclear bomb explosion from 1945 to 1998. Despite its relatively long duration of 14 minutes, this video is extremely effective. It’s both unsettling and sickening to see all the areas contaminated and resources wasted in the name of “domestic security.”

The Buddy System: Two Fish Swimming Side-by-Side by Birgitt Boschitsch ‘13, Peter Dewey (GS), Alexander Smits (fac) of the Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Princeton University. (As seen in Princeton’s Art of Science 2010 Gallery.)

In developing next-generation autonomous underwater vehicles we look for inspiration from the intelligent designs observed in nature.
For this image, two artificial fish fins are placed side-by-side and flapped in-phase with each another as water flows past the fins (flow direction is up). Small hydrogen bubbles (the white part of the image) allow for the wake of the fins to be visualized. The interaction of the fins creates two repeating patterns of swirling vortices known as vortex streets.

The Buddy System: Two Fish Swimming Side-by-Side by Birgitt Boschitsch ‘13, Peter Dewey (GS), Alexander Smits (fac) of the Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Princeton University. (As seen in Princeton’s Art of Science 2010 Gallery.)

In developing next-generation autonomous underwater vehicles we look for inspiration from the intelligent designs observed in nature.

For this image, two artificial fish fins are placed side-by-side and flapped in-phase with each another as water flows past the fins (flow direction is up). Small hydrogen bubbles (the white part of the image) allow for the wake of the fins to be visualized. The interaction of the fins creates two repeating patterns of swirling vortices known as vortex streets.

expose-the-light:

The planets of the solar system imagined as human (and canine) characters

The manga Hetalia personifies nations as a group of constantly bickering characters. Artist Irene Flores has done something similar for the solar system, minus the bickering, with cheerful characters based on the eight planets, plus Pluto.

Flores has been creating these original characters for an unnamed project. Perhaps a children’s book or a comic? I love how she’s translated each celestial body into a distinct character — elegant Saturn, Jupiter and his large family of moons, fleet-footed Mercury. Pluto, as the dwarf planet, gets to be the solar system’s dog (although perhaps it’s just a play on the Disney character). She also has an additional illustration below, with the Earth and two unnamed characters, whom I suspect are Earth’s moon and the sun.

Hopefully, we’ll get a chance to see what Flores has in store for these characters as her project grows.

[Irene Flores via The Uniblogger]

Oh goodness, I love this. Pluto as a dog is perfect, Uranus as a jaded preteen, and Venus as a bombshell who could actually kill you within seconds. OH, AND EARTH HAS A BAND-AID, no doubt symbolic of the fact that our little planet has quite a few boo-boos nowadays from our environmental negligence. I give this an A+ for attention to detail.

A sculpture by Luca Pozzi based on the String Theory, which will be featured in the Higher Atlas exhibition, at the Marrakech Biennale, from February 29th to June 3rd. Read More

A sculpture by Luca Pozzi based on the String Theory, which will be featured in the Higher Atlas exhibition, at the Marrakech Biennale, from February 29th to June 3rd. Read More

These two global snapshots, the first between North America and Europe, and the second over Eurasia, were arranged by Felix Pharand-Deschenes to display how air traffic corridors have come to dominate the surface of Earth. (via)

Mary Anning (1799 – 1847)

In 1811, Mary Anning’s brother spotted what he thought was a crocodile skeleton in a seaside cliff near the family’s Lyme Regis, England, home. He charged his 11-year-old sister with its recovery, and she eventually dug out a skull and 60 vertebrae, selling them to a private collector for £23. This find was no croc, though, and was eventually named Ichthyosaurus, the “fish-lizard.” Thus began Anning’s long career as a fossil hunter. In addition to ichthyosaurs, she found long-necked plesiosaurs, a pterodactyl and hundreds, possibly thousands, of other fossils that helped scientists to draw a picture of the marine world 200 million to 140 million years ago during the Jurassic. She had little formal education and so taught herself anatomy, geology, paleontology and scientific illustration. Scientists of the time traveled from as far away as New York City to Lyme Regis to consult and hunt for fossils with Anning.

Mary Anning (1799 – 1847)

In 1811, Mary Anning’s brother spotted what he thought was a crocodile skeleton in a seaside cliff near the family’s Lyme Regis, England, home. He charged his 11-year-old sister with its recovery, and she eventually dug out a skull and 60 vertebrae, selling them to a private collector for £23. This find was no croc, though, and was eventually named Ichthyosaurus, the “fish-lizard.” Thus began Anning’s long career as a fossil hunter. In addition to ichthyosaurs, she found long-necked plesiosaurs, a pterodactyl and hundreds, possibly thousands, of other fossils that helped scientists to draw a picture of the marine world 200 million to 140 million years ago during the Jurassic. She had little formal education and so taught herself anatomy, geology, paleontology and scientific illustration. Scientists of the time traveled from as far away as New York City to Lyme Regis to consult and hunt for fossils with Anning.

approachingsignificance:

approachingsignificance:

DNA 11: Personal DNA Portraits

Is this narcissistic, or science appreciation? I couldn’t sleep with a painting or photo of myself above me, but the thought of my DNA above me doesn’t trigger the same reaction. 

I wouldn’t want this in my bedroom, but kitchen? HELL YES. It will go nicely with my beaker  dinner glasses, petri dish plates, and periodic table table.

video platform video management video solutions video player

Scientists and engineers have been fascinated with spider silk’s amazing and unimaginable capabilities, as it is one of the toughest, yet most delicate materials in existence. The latest use has been in a bow of a violin, enabling musicians to play profoundly soft and versatile melodies.

Hugh Turvey originally trained as a designer and art director, until, in 1996, he discovered a love for a somewhat unconventional medium. Upon being requested to X-ray a human skull for a friend’s album cover, he discovered that, when it came to many commonplace items, beauty is not skin deep, but rather beauty is more abstract from within. From then on, his fascination with X-ray art merely grew, as he began to use colored X-rays on any item he could think of. Turvey has said,

I’m driven by my curiosity. It’s about discovering the world around us. As a kid I would take things apart to see what was inside and how they worked. I have an insane curiosity for how things work. X-ray gives me a way to get that insight and turn it into art.

In this particular collection, Turvey X-rayed flowers, such as:

  1. Stargazer lilies
  2. Seaweed
  3. Hyacinths (at various stages of development)
  4. Elderflower
  5. Orchid 

Click to see more of this collection

A view of Coca-Cola magnified under a high-tech laboratory lens by Florida State University’s Chemistry Department. The different colors and patterns are created by the drink’s crystalized sugars, making every liquid observed in this study unique. 

A view of Coca-Cola magnified under a high-tech laboratory lens by Florida State University’s Chemistry Department. The different colors and patterns are created by the drink’s crystalized sugars, making every liquid observed in this study unique. 

 
In honor of John Glenn’s February 2nd, 1962 flight in Friendship 7, which made him the first American to orbit Earth. He ended up circling the plant three times during his 4 hours and 55 minutes in orbit, thus seeing three sunsets and sunrises from an altitude of 162 miles. Now, at the age of 90, when described as a “hero” for his legendary and amazingly successful journey, Glenn remains humble, saying

I don’t think of myself that way. I get up each day and have the same problems others have at my age. As far as trying to analyze all the attention I received, I will leave that to others.

Read more about his journey and a personal interview at the New York Times.

In honor of John Glenn’s February 2nd, 1962 flight in Friendship 7, which made him the first American to orbit Earth. He ended up circling the plant three times during his 4 hours and 55 minutes in orbit, thus seeing three sunsets and sunrises from an altitude of 162 miles. Now, at the age of 90, when described as a “hero” for his legendary and amazingly successful journey, Glenn remains humble, saying

I don’t think of myself that way. I get up each day and have the same problems others have at my age. As far as trying to analyze all the attention I received, I will leave that to others.

Read more about his journey and a personal interview at the New York Times.

Resin cast of the lungs displaying the branching out of bronchi, in addition to the pulmonary arteries and trachea. The bronchi and pulmonary arteries work together in using inhaled air to oxygenate blood and exhale carbon dioxide.Photograph by Martin Dohrn.

Resin cast of the lungs displaying the branching out of bronchi, in addition to the pulmonary arteries and trachea. The bronchi and pulmonary arteries work together in using inhaled air to oxygenate blood and exhale carbon dioxide.
Photograph by Martin Dohrn.

Pictured above is one of the many works of Santiago Ramon y Cajal, an artist whose relentless focus on the nervous system both displayed unmatchable views inside of our brains and led to remarkable findings within this previously misunderstood anatomical region. In the above illustration, Cajal depicted a diagram of the spinal cord with both individual cells and entire nerve tracts. According to his sketch, motor commands travel down the spine from the left side of the brain, while sensory feedback travels up the spine to the right side of the brain.
See more of his works and read an in-depth biography at Discover Magazine.

Pictured above is one of the many works of Santiago Ramon y Cajal, an artist whose relentless focus on the nervous system both displayed unmatchable views inside of our brains and led to remarkable findings within this previously misunderstood anatomical region. In the above illustration, Cajal depicted a diagram of the spinal cord with both individual cells and entire nerve tracts. According to his sketch, motor commands travel down the spine from the left side of the brain, while sensory feedback travels up the spine to the right side of the brain.

See more of his works and read an in-depth biography at Discover Magazine.

divingintotheclay:

Ray Finch 1914-2012
[borrowed from Hollis Engley’s blog]

divingintotheclay:

Ray Finch 1914-2012

[borrowed from Hollis Engley’s blog]

Meteorite Pop-Art

Scientists use X-rays, dyes, fancy microscopes and other tools to see things we can’t capture with our naked eyes. But these tools aren’t just good for science, they can make art. An exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History explores the beauty in scientific imaging. These pictures illustrate the chemical composition of four meteorites, which was detected by scanning them with a beam of electrons. Red represents magnesium, green is calcium, and blue is aluminum.

Meteorite Pop-Art

Scientists use X-rays, dyes, fancy microscopes and other tools to see things we can’t capture with our naked eyes. But these tools aren’t just good for science, they can make art. An exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History explores the beauty in scientific imaging. These pictures illustrate the chemical composition of four meteorites, which was detected by scanning them with a beam of electrons. Red represents magnesium, green is calcium, and blue is aluminum.