According to the Center for Disease Control:

This digitally-colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of an untreated water specimen extracted from a wild stream mainly used to control flooding during inclement weather, revealed the presence of unidentified organisms, which included bacteria, protozoa, and algae. In this particular view, a microorganism is featured, the exterior of which is covered by numerous projections imparting an appearance of a sea urchin. This microscopic “pin cushion” was tethered to its surroundings by a biofilm within which many bacteria, and amoeboid protozoa could be seen enmeshed as well. 

According to the Center for Disease Control:

This digitally-colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of an untreated water specimen extracted from a wild stream mainly used to control flooding during inclement weather, revealed the presence of unidentified organisms, which included bacteria, protozoa, and algae. In this particular view, a microorganism is featured, the exterior of which is covered by numerous projections imparting an appearance of a sea urchin. This microscopic “pin cushion” was tethered to its surroundings by a biofilm within which many bacteria, and amoeboid protozoa could be seen enmeshed as well. 

Unpolished, 150 million year-old agatized dinosaur bone cells at 42x magnification. By Douglas Moore of University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point.This image won 10th place in the 2011 Nikon Small World Competition. 

Unpolished, 150 million year-old agatized dinosaur bone cells at 42x magnification. By Douglas Moore of University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point.
This image won 10th place in the 2011 Nikon Small World Competition. 

In this scanning electron micrograph, a small cancerous tumor covered in microvilli, microscopic hairlike structures which enable absorption and secretion, is shown within a human lung. (via National Geographic)

In this scanning electron micrograph, a small cancerous tumor covered in microvilli, microscopic hairlike structures which enable absorption and secretion, is shown within a human lung. (via National Geographic)

Mast cell within collagen fibers in a human eye with conjunctivitis, at 7000x magnification. by Donald Pottle of The Schepens Eye Research Institute

Mast cell within collagen fibers in a human eye with conjunctivitis, at 7000x magnification. 
by Donald Pottle of The Schepens Eye Research Institute

magnified-world:

Rostellar hook arrangement of a tapeworm at 30x magnification.  19th place Nikon Small World Competition.

magnified-world:

Rostellar hook arrangement of a tapeworm at 30x magnification.  19th place Nikon Small World Competition.

Radiolaria Polycystinea. Fossilized, ancient single cell organism, from the Barbados Islands, at 1500x magnification. Imaged in low vacuum mode after having received a thin gold coating. (by FEI Company)

Radiolaria Polycystinea. Fossilized, ancient single cell organism, from the Barbados Islands, at 1500x magnification. Imaged in low vacuum mode after having received a thin gold coating. (by FEI Company)

This is a photomicrograph at 1000x magnification of malignant lymphoma tumor, which displays large, loosely cohesive lymphoid cells. You can particularly see the difference in size between the lymphoma cells and the endothelial cells towards the center. (via)

This is a photomicrograph at 1000x magnification of malignant lymphoma tumor, which displays large, loosely cohesive lymphoid cells. You can particularly see the difference in size between the lymphoma cells and the endothelial cells towards the center. (via)

Chloroplasts in mesophyll cells, with cyan representing proteins and red representing chlorophyll (by Fernan Federici)

Chloroplasts in mesophyll cells, with cyan representing proteins and red representing chlorophyll (by Fernan Federici)

The root of a legume with rhizobium bacteria, which help the plant with nitrogen fixation, thus fertilizing the soil. Via leboski on Flickr

The root of a legume with rhizobium bacteria, which help the plant with nitrogen fixation, thus fertilizing the soil. 
Via leboski on Flickr

Carmen Laethem, Aerie Pharmaceuticals, USA by GE Healthcare on Flickr.
Primary Porcine Trabecular Meshwork Cells stained for actin (blue), tubulin (green) and focal adhesions (red).

Carmen Laethem, Aerie Pharmaceuticals, USA by GE Healthcare on Flickr.

Primary Porcine Trabecular Meshwork Cells stained for actin (blue), tubulin (green) and focal adhesions (red).

Dorothy Hodgkin (1910 – 1994)Pictured here with Linus Paulding 

Dorothy Crowfoot (Hodgkin, after her 1937 marriage) was born in Cairo, Egypt, to a pair of British archaeologists. She was sent home to England for school, where she was one of only two girls who were allowed to study chemistry with the boys. At 18, she enrolled in one of Oxford’s women’s colleges and studied chemistry and then moved to Cambridge to study X-ray crystallography, a type of imaging that uses X-rays to determine a molecule’s three-dimensional structure. She returned to Oxford in 1934, where she would spend most of her working life, teaching chemistry and using X-ray crystallography to study interesting biological molecules. She spent years perfecting the technique, for which she was awarded a Nobel Prize in 1964, and determined the structures of penicillin, vitamin B12 and insulin. In 2010, 16 years after her death, the British Royal Mail celebrated the 350th anniversary of the Royal Society by issuing stamps with the likenesses of 10 of the society’s most illustrious members, including Isaac Newton and Benjamin Franklin; Hodgkin was the only woman in the group.

Dorothy Hodgkin (1910 – 1994)
Pictured here with Linus Paulding 

Dorothy Crowfoot (Hodgkin, after her 1937 marriage) was born in Cairo, Egypt, to a pair of British archaeologists. She was sent home to England for school, where she was one of only two girls who were allowed to study chemistry with the boys. At 18, she enrolled in one of Oxford’s women’s colleges and studied chemistry and then moved to Cambridge to study X-ray crystallography, a type of imaging that uses X-rays to determine a molecule’s three-dimensional structure. She returned to Oxford in 1934, where she would spend most of her working life, teaching chemistry and using X-ray crystallography to study interesting biological molecules. She spent years perfecting the technique, for which she was awarded a Nobel Prize in 1964, and determined the structures of penicillin, vitamin B12 and insulin. In 2010, 16 years after her death, the British Royal Mail celebrated the 350th anniversary of the Royal Society by issuing stamps with the likenesses of 10 of the society’s most illustrious members, including Isaac Newton and Benjamin Franklin; Hodgkin was the only woman in the group.

Stephanopyxis palmeriana

Stephanopyxis palmeriana

Seen here is the cells of the largest organ in the human body: the skin. This scanning electron micrograph shows the epidermis, which is the tough, outermost coating of the skin, formed by overlapping layers of dead skin cells that are continuously removed and replaced by the living cells underneath. (via)

Seen here is the cells of the largest organ in the human body: the skin. This scanning electron micrograph shows the epidermis, which is the tough, outermost coating of the skin, formed by overlapping layers of dead skin cells that are continuously removed and replaced by the living cells underneath. (via)

The Body’s Countdown to Death or Cancer
Described by some as a “doomsday clock”, every cell within the human body has a limit to the number of times it is able to safely divide, due to the telomeres on the ends of each chromosome. These telomeres act as caps on the tops of the chromosomes to protect the precious genetic material from fraying, but with every cell division these telomeres are shortened. 
Upon shrinking to a certain point, the telomere’s function is critically impaired. Technically, at this point the cell is supposed to die; however, when it continues to live, it proceeds as a cancerous cell. Now, based on recent research, scientists are hypothesizing that a drug could be developed to control the telomeres, effectively treating both cancer and aging diseases.
Read More

The Body’s Countdown to Death or Cancer

Described by some as a “doomsday clock”, every cell within the human body has a limit to the number of times it is able to safely divide, due to the telomeres on the ends of each chromosome. These telomeres act as caps on the tops of the chromosomes to protect the precious genetic material from fraying, but with every cell division these telomeres are shortened. 

Upon shrinking to a certain point, the telomere’s function is critically impaired. Technically, at this point the cell is supposed to die; however, when it continues to live, it proceeds as a cancerous cell. Now, based on recent research, scientists are hypothesizing that a drug could be developed to control the telomeres, effectively treating both cancer and aging diseases.

Read More