theatlantic:

Amazingly, Actual Molecules Look Just Like High School Textbook Drawings

Those little hexagon diagrams you studied in chemistry class turn out to be very close representations of the real thing.
Read more. [Images: Sciencexpress]

theatlantic:

Amazingly, Actual Molecules Look Just Like High School Textbook Drawings

Those little hexagon diagrams you studied in chemistry class turn out to be very close representations of the real thing.

Read more. [Images: Sciencexpress]

breakingnews:

World’s smallest movie created by moving individual atoms

AP: IBM says it has made the tiniest stop-motion movie ever - a one-minute video of individual carbon monoxide molecules repeatedly rearranged to show a boy dancing, throwing a ball and bouncing on a trampoline.

Each frame measures 45 by 25 nanometres there are 25 million nanometres in an inch but hugely magnified, the movie is reminiscent of early video games, particularly when the boy bounces the ball off the side of the frame accompanied by simple music and sound effects.

Video: A Boy And His Atom (IBM via YouTube)

I love this! So cute and clever!

An aluminothermic reaction with iron (III) oxide. In this particular thermite reaction, a magnesium ribbon was used to ignite the mixture within a glass jar. What appear to be sparks flying outwards are actually globules of molten iron.

An aluminothermic reaction with iron (III) oxide. In this particular thermite reaction, a magnesium ribbon was used to ignite the mixture within a glass jar. What appear to be sparks flying outwards are actually globules of molten iron.

breakingbadworld:


As many of you know, I have a background as a chemistry teacher. I’ve come to realize that much of what I teach my students applies not only to what goes on in the classroom, but in life also. It’s not as crazy as it sounds. You see, technically, chemistry is the study of matter, but I prefer to see it as the study of change: Electrons change their energy levels. Molecules change their bonds. Elements combine and change into compounds. But that’s all of life, right? It’s the constant, it’s the cycle. It’s solution, dissolution. Just over and over and over. It is growth, then decay, then transformation. It’s fascinating really. It’s a shame so many of us never take time to consider its implications.
Walt’s Wisdom—Blog of Walter White


I mean, I know this is from a television show about cooking meth (a fantastic show, if you haven’t watched yet), but still. This statement should ring true for all students who have studied any science.

breakingbadworld:

As many of you know, I have a background as a chemistry teacher. I’ve come to realize that much of what I teach my students applies not only to what goes on in the classroom, but in life also. It’s not as crazy as it sounds. You see, technically, chemistry is the study of matter, but I prefer to see it as the study of change: Electrons change their energy levels. Molecules change their bonds. Elements combine and change into compounds. But that’s all of life, right? It’s the constant, it’s the cycle. It’s solution, dissolution. Just over and over and over. It is growth, then decay, then transformation. It’s fascinating really. It’s a shame so many of us never take time to consider its implications.

Walt’s Wisdom—Blog of Walter White

I mean, I know this is from a television show about cooking meth (a fantastic show, if you haven’t watched yet), but still. This statement should ring true for all students who have studied any science.

Recrystallized melted mixture of acetanalide, resorcinal and carbon tetra bromide, at 33x magnification. By John Hart of Hart3D Films in Boulder, Colorado. Won 13th place in the 2009 Nikon Small World Competition.

Recrystallized melted mixture of acetanalide, resorcinal and carbon tetra bromide, at 33x magnification. By John Hart of Hart3D Films in Boulder, Colorado. Won 13th place in the 2009 Nikon Small World Competition.

jtotheizzoe:

The Stuff of Everything

There’s 94 naturally occurring elements on Earth. Mankind has a relationship with nearly all of them. 94 Elements is a new global filmmaking project that will explore our life through the lens of the elements.

It’s not just the silicon in the lens glass that captures these images, but the potassium, boron and lanthanum that improve its refractive index (great video on making Leica lenses here). The indium in the computer display the film editor used and on which you are reading this. The carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, oxygen and hydrogen that makes up your genetic code, creating a body that seeks to discover, study, mine, and utilize these 94 ingredients of matter. Ingredients that we are running out of.

These movies are their human stories, and you can help support the ongoing project with your donations (via their Indiegogo fundraising site), or even your films. View the amazing first batch of films here.

(via 94 Elements - Stories from Hydrogen to Plutonium)

In the Sawmill Sink in Abaco, the water at a depth of 30 to 26 feet is pigmented by the bacteria. But the real danger lies in the hydrogen sulfide gas, which forces divers to hastily proceed through. Photo by Wes C. Skiles.

In the Sawmill Sink in Abaco, the water at a depth of 30 to 26 feet is pigmented by the bacteria. But the real danger lies in the hydrogen sulfide gas, which forces divers to hastily proceed through. Photo by Wes C. Skiles.

expose-the-light:

20 Things You Didn’t Know About Water
1  Water is everywhere—there are 332,500,000 cubic miles of it on the earth’s surface. But less than 1 percent of it is fresh and accessible, even when you include bottled water.
2  And “fresh” can be a relative term. Before 2009, federal regulators did not require water bottlers to remove E. coli.
3  Actually, E. coli doesn’t sound so bad. In 1999 the Natural Resources Defense Council found that one brand of spring water came from a well in an industrial parking lot near a hazardous waste dump.
4  Cheers! The new Water Recovery System on the International Space Station recycles 93 percent of astronauts’ perspiration and urine, turning it back into drinking water.
5  Kurdish villages in northern Iraq are using a portable version of the NASA system to purify water from streams and rivers, courtesy of the relief group Concern for Kids.
6  Ice is a lattice of tetra­hedrally bonded molecules that contain a lot of empty space. That’s why it floats.
7  Even after ice melts, some of those tetrahedrons almost always remain, like tiny ice cubes 100 molecules wide. So every glass of water, no matter what its temperature, comes on the rocks.
8  You can make your own water by mixing hydrogen and oxygen in a container and adding a spark. Unfortunately, that is the formula that helped destroy the Hindenburg.
9  Scientists have a less explosive recipe for extracting energy from hydrogen and oxygen. Strip away electrons from some hydrogen molecules, add oxygen molecules with too many electrons, and bingo! You get an electric current. That’s what happens in a fuel cell.
10  Good gardeners know not to water plants during the day. Droplets clinging to the leaves can act as little magnifying glasses, focusing sunlight and causing the plants to burn.
11  Hair on your skin can hold water droplets too. A hairy leg may get sunburned more quickly than a shaved one.
12  Vicious cycle: Water in the stratosphere contributes to the current warming of the earth’s atmosphere. That in turn may increase the severity of tropical cyclones, which throw more water into the stratosphere. That’s the theory, anyway.
13  The slower rate of warming in the past decade might be due to a 10 percent drop in stratospheric water. Cause: unknown.
14  Although many doctors tell patients to drink eight glasses of water a day, there is no scientific evidence to support this advice.
15  The misinformation might have come from a 1945 report recommending that Americans consume about “1 milliliter of water for each calorie of food,” which amounts to 8 or 10 cups a day. But the report added that much of that water comes from food—a nuance many people apparently missed.
16  Call waterholics anonymous: Drinking significantly more water than is needed can cause “water intoxication” and lead to fatal cerebral and pulmonary edema. Amateur marathon runners have died this way.
17  Scientists at Oregon State University have identified vast reservoirs of water beneath the ocean floor. In fact, there may be more water under the oceans than in them.
18  Without water, ocean crust would not sink back into the earth’s mantle. There would be no plate tectonics, and our planet would probably be a lot like Venus: hellish and inert.
19  At the other end of the wetness scale, planet GJ 1214b, which orbits a red dwarf star, may be almost entirely water.
20  Recent evidence suggests that when the solar system formed 4.5 billion years ago, comets had liquid cores. If so, life may have started in a comet.

My mother and I could talk your ears off about water purification.

expose-the-light:

20 Things You Didn’t Know About Water

Water is everywhere—there are 332,500,000 cubic miles of it on the earth’s surface. But less than 1 percent of it is fresh and accessible, even when you include bottled water.

And “fresh” can be a relative term. Before 2009, federal regulators did not require water bottlers to remove E. coli.

3  Actually, E. coli doesn’t sound so bad. In 1999 the Natural Resources Defense Council found that one brand of spring water came from a well in an industrial parking lot near a hazardous waste dump.

4  Cheers! The new Water Recovery System on the International Space Station recycles 93 percent of astronauts’ perspiration and urine, turning it back into drinking water.

Kurdish villages in northern Iraq are using a portable version of the NASA system to purify water from streams and rivers, courtesy of the relief group Concern for Kids.

Ice is a lattice of tetra­hedrally bonded molecules that contain a lot of empty space. That’s why it floats.

Even after ice melts, some of those tetrahedrons almost always remain, like tiny ice cubes 100 molecules wide. So every glass of water, no matter what its temperature, comes on the rocks.

8  You can make your own water by mixing hydrogen and oxygen in a container and adding a spark. Unfortunately, that is the formula that helped destroy the Hindenburg.

9  Scientists have a less explosive recipe for extracting energy from hydrogen and oxygen. Strip away electrons from some hydrogen molecules, add oxygen molecules with too many electrons, and bingo! You get an electric current. That’s what happens in a fuel cell.

10  Good gardeners know not to water plants during the day. Droplets clinging to the leaves can act as little magnifying glasses, focusing sunlight and causing the plants to burn.

11  Hair on your skin can hold water droplets too. A hairy leg may get sunburned more quickly than a shaved one.

12  Vicious cycle: Water in the stratosphere contributes to the current warming of the earth’s atmosphere. That in turn may increase the severity of tropical cyclones, which throw more water into the stratosphere. That’s the theory, anyway.

13  The slower rate of warming in the past decade might be due to a 10 percent drop in stratospheric water. Cause: unknown.

14  Although many doctors tell patients to drink eight glasses of water a day, there is no scientific evidence to support this advice.

15  The misinformation might have come from a 1945 report recommending that Americans consume about “1 milliliter of water for each calorie of food,” which amounts to 8 or 10 cups a day. But the report added that much of that water comes from food—a nuance many people apparently missed.

16  Call waterholics anonymous: Drinking significantly more water than is needed can cause “water intoxication” and lead to fatal cerebral and pulmonary edema. Amateur marathon runners have died this way.

17  Scientists at Oregon State University have identified vast reservoirs of water beneath the ocean floor. In fact, there may be more water under the oceans than in them.

18  Without water, ocean crust would not sink back into the earth’s mantle. There would be no plate tectonics, and our planet would probably be a lot like Venus: hellish and inert.

19  At the other end of the wetness scale, planet GJ 1214b, which orbits a red dwarf star, may be almost entirely water.

20  Recent evidence suggests that when the solar system formed 4.5 billion years ago, comets had liquid cores. If so, life may have started in a comet.

My mother and I could talk your ears off about water purification.

Trazodone, a common antidepressant, at 100x magnification, by Lars Bech of Naarden, The Netherlands. 

Trazodone, a common antidepressant, at 100x magnification, by Lars Bech of Naarden, The Netherlands. 

A diffraction image of a protein crystal, which is created by using a particle accelerator to irradiate the protein with X-rays. This technique enables scientists to see internal structures of complex protein molecules such as enzymes. (via)

A diffraction image of a protein crystal, which is created by using a particle accelerator to irradiate the protein with X-rays. This technique enables scientists to see internal structures of complex protein molecules such as enzymes. (via)

laboratoryequipment:

Drug Discovery Lab to Open in 2014Purdue Univ. will take another step forward as a leader in pharmaceutical development efforts with construction of the new Drug Discovery Building. The $25 million facility, which is scheduled to open in 2014, was celebrated during an event in the university’s Stewart Center.“Purdue research has been at the forefront of drug discovery, and this building is another step in assuring that we attract top scientists to further our efforts in finding solutions to real-world problems,” says Purdue President France Córdova. “Purdue is committed to becoming one of the top destinations for drug discovery.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Drug-Discovery-Lab-Under-Construction-042012.aspx

I’m experiencing a sudden, unexplained desire to move to the midwest…

laboratoryequipment:

Drug Discovery Lab to Open in 2014

Purdue Univ. will take another step forward as a leader in pharmaceutical development efforts with construction of the new Drug Discovery Building. The $25 million facility, which is scheduled to open in 2014, was celebrated during an event in the university’s Stewart Center.

“Purdue research has been at the forefront of drug discovery, and this building is another step in assuring that we attract top scientists to further our efforts in finding solutions to real-world problems,” says Purdue President France Córdova. “Purdue is committed to becoming one of the top destinations for drug discovery.”

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Drug-Discovery-Lab-Under-Construction-042012.aspx

I’m experiencing a sudden, unexplained desire to move to the midwest…

A vanadium crystal, at about 1 cm long. Grown from a gas phase, the colors are caused by a thin oxide layer. (by Paul’s Lab)

A vanadium crystal, at about 1 cm long. Grown from a gas phase, the colors are caused by a thin oxide layer. (by Paul’s Lab)


Hydrogen Orbital Cookies

I’m going to make these yes yes yes

Hydrogen Orbital Cookies

I’m going to make these yes yes yes

Mitomycin, an anti-cancer drug, at 10x magnification. By Margaret Oechsli, of Jewish Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky. Won 7th place in the 2008 Nikon Small World Competition.

Mitomycin, an anti-cancer drug, at 10x magnification. By Margaret Oechsli, of Jewish Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky. Won 7th place in the 2008 Nikon Small World Competition.

Bismuth crystal cluster, at 4cm in diameter. (by Paul’s Lab)

Bismuth crystal cluster, at 4cm in diameter. (by Paul’s Lab)