medicineisnotmerchandise:



Holoprosencephaly

medicineisnotmerchandise:

Holoprosencephaly

themicrobiologist:

Adenoviruses (AdVs) are DNA viruses that infect many vertebrate hosts, including humans and nonhuman primates. Here we identify a novel AdV species, provisionally named “simian adenovirus C (SAdV-C),” associated with a 1997 outbreak of acute respiratory illness in captive baboons (4 of 9) at a primate research facility in Texas. None of the six AdVs recovered from baboons (BaAdVs) during the outbreak, including the two baboons who died from pneumonia, were typeable. Since clinical samples from the two fatal cases were not available, whole-genome sequencing of nasal isolates from one sick baboon and three asymptomatic baboons during the outbreak was performed. Three AdVs were members of species SAdV-C (BaAdV-2 and BaAdV-4 were genetically identical, and BaAdV-3), while one (BaAdV-1) was a member of the recently described SAdV-B species. BaAdV-3 was the only AdV among the 4 isolated from a sick baboon, and thus was deemed to be the cause of the outbreak. Significant divergence (<58% amino acid identity) was found in one of the fiber proteins of BaAdV-3 relative to BaAdV-2 and -4, suggesting that BaAdV-3 may be a rare SAdV-C recombinant. Neutralizing antibodies to the other 3 AdVs, but not BaAdV-3, were detected in healthy baboons from 1996 to 2003 and staff personnel from 1997. These results implicate a novel adenovirus species (SAdV-C) in an acute respiratory outbreak in a baboon colony and underscore the potential for cross-species transmission of AdVs between humans and nonhuman primates.
Source: mBio

themicrobiologist:

Adenoviruses (AdVs) are DNA viruses that infect many vertebrate hosts, including humans and nonhuman primates. Here we identify a novel AdV species, provisionally named “simian adenovirus C (SAdV-C),” associated with a 1997 outbreak of acute respiratory illness in captive baboons (4 of 9) at a primate research facility in Texas. None of the six AdVs recovered from baboons (BaAdVs) during the outbreak, including the two baboons who died from pneumonia, were typeable. Since clinical samples from the two fatal cases were not available, whole-genome sequencing of nasal isolates from one sick baboon and three asymptomatic baboons during the outbreak was performed. Three AdVs were members of species SAdV-C (BaAdV-2 and BaAdV-4 were genetically identical, and BaAdV-3), while one (BaAdV-1) was a member of the recently described SAdV-B species. BaAdV-3 was the only AdV among the 4 isolated from a sick baboon, and thus was deemed to be the cause of the outbreak. Significant divergence (<58% amino acid identity) was found in one of the fiber proteins of BaAdV-3 relative to BaAdV-2 and -4, suggesting that BaAdV-3 may be a rare SAdV-C recombinant. Neutralizing antibodies to the other 3 AdVs, but not BaAdV-3, were detected in healthy baboons from 1996 to 2003 and staff personnel from 1997. These results implicate a novel adenovirus species (SAdV-C) in an acute respiratory outbreak in a baboon colony and underscore the potential for cross-species transmission of AdVs between humans and nonhuman primates.

Source: mBio

scinerds:



Blood Clot
NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

scinerds:

Blood Clot

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

afracturedreality:

Human Papillomavirus
Shown in this electron micrograph from 1986 is a single, negatively stained human papilloma virus (HPV), the primary culprit of skin warts and cervical cancer.
Note how the papillomavirus is non-enveloped, meaning that its outer protein coat, or capsid, is not covered by a lipid bilayer membrane. The HPV capsid looks roughly spherical, but, in fact, it has an icosahedral symmetry with a triangulation number equal to 7. Rather than a structure based on pentamers mixed with hexamers (like that of the soccer ball), the HPV capsid is composed of 72 L1 pentamers of two different types: 60 hexavalent pentamers and 12 pentavalent pentamers.
References: Visual Science / Wikipedia.Photo Credit: Laboratory of Tumor Virus Biology / National Cancer Institute.

afracturedreality:

Human Papillomavirus

Shown in this electron micrograph from 1986 is a single, negatively stained human papilloma virus (HPV), the primary culprit of skin warts and cervical cancer.

Note how the papillomavirus is non-enveloped, meaning that its outer protein coat, or capsid, is not covered by a lipid bilayer membrane. The HPV capsid looks roughly spherical, but, in fact, it has an icosahedral symmetry with a triangulation number equal to 7. Rather than a structure based on pentamers mixed with hexamers (like that of the soccer ball), the HPV capsid is composed of 72 L1 pentamers of two different types: 60 hexavalent pentamers and 12 pentavalent pentamers.

References: Visual Science / Wikipedia.
Photo Credit
: Laboratory of Tumor Virus Biology / National Cancer Institute.

The Nuss Procedure is a corrective surgery for a disorder called Pectus Excavatum, in which a patient&#8217;s breastbone is sunken into the chest, possibly interfering with the functioning of the heart and lungs, in addition to creating a visual &#8220;dent&#8221; in the chest.
Developed by Dr. Donald Nuss of Children&#8217;s Hospital of the Kings Daughters in Norfolk, VA, this procedure inserts a curved metal bar underneath the sternum, for a period of about two to four years, to reposition the bones. 
Side Note/inspiration for this post: I have known two people to have gone through this surgery, including my brother, and due to our location, they both were patients of Dr. Nuss himself.  (And, no, my brother had no trouble going through airport security, but we had a doctor&#8217;s note just in case!)

The Nuss Procedure is a corrective surgery for a disorder called Pectus Excavatum, in which a patient’s breastbone is sunken into the chest, possibly interfering with the functioning of the heart and lungs, in addition to creating a visual “dent” in the chest.

Developed by Dr. Donald Nuss of Children’s Hospital of the Kings Daughters in Norfolk, VA, this procedure inserts a curved metal bar underneath the sternum, for a period of about two to four years, to reposition the bones. 

Side Note/inspiration for this post: I have known two people to have gone through this surgery, including my brother, and due to our location, they both were patients of Dr. Nuss himself.  (And, no, my brother had no trouble going through airport security, but we had a doctor’s note just in case!)

scinerds:


The Superficial Lymphatics and Glands of the Head, Face and Neck. Drawn by Henry Vandyke Carter, for Henry Gray’s Anatomy: Descriptive and Surgical.


(This is the kind of post about which I am inferring. I found a million of these, and I actually just set out and bought a physical copy of Gray&#8217;s Anatomy)

scinerds:

The Superficial Lymphatics and Glands of the Head, Face and Neck. 
D
rawn by Henry Vandyke Carter, for Henry Gray’s Anatomy: Descriptive and Surgical.

(This is the kind of post about which I am inferring. I found a million of these, and I actually just set out and bought a physical copy of Gray’s Anatomy)

milesian:

Enlarged Heart
The differences between a normal human heart and one enlarged by alcoholism and high blood pressure. Covered in scar tissue, the enlarged organ is nearly twice the normal size. Such alcoholic cardiomyopathy weakens the heart so that it is unable to pump blood adequately

milesian:

Enlarged Heart

The differences between a normal human heart and one enlarged by alcoholism and high blood pressure. Covered in scar tissue, the enlarged organ is nearly twice the normal size. Such alcoholic cardiomyopathy weakens the heart so that it is unable to pump blood adequately

Trazodone, a common antidepressant, at 100x magnification, by Lars Bech of Naarden, The Netherlands. 

Trazodone, a common antidepressant, at 100x magnification, by Lars Bech of Naarden, The Netherlands. 

Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, as seen on cultures of cotton-tail rabbit epithelium cells. (Via the CDC)

Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, as seen on cultures of cotton-tail rabbit epithelium cells. (Via the CDC)

laboratoryequipment:

Drug Discovery Lab to Open in 2014Purdue Univ. will take another step forward as a leader in pharmaceutical development efforts with construction of the new Drug Discovery Building. The $25 million facility, which is scheduled to open in 2014, was celebrated during an event in the university’s Stewart Center.“Purdue research has been at the forefront of drug discovery, and this building is another step in assuring that we attract top scientists to further our efforts in finding solutions to real-world problems,” says Purdue President France Córdova. “Purdue is committed to becoming one of the top destinations for drug discovery.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Drug-Discovery-Lab-Under-Construction-042012.aspx

I&#8217;m experiencing a sudden, unexplained desire to move to the midwest&#8230;

laboratoryequipment:

Drug Discovery Lab to Open in 2014

Purdue Univ. will take another step forward as a leader in pharmaceutical development efforts with construction of the new Drug Discovery Building. The $25 million facility, which is scheduled to open in 2014, was celebrated during an event in the university’s Stewart Center.

“Purdue research has been at the forefront of drug discovery, and this building is another step in assuring that we attract top scientists to further our efforts in finding solutions to real-world problems,” says Purdue President France Córdova. “Purdue is committed to becoming one of the top destinations for drug discovery.”

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Drug-Discovery-Lab-Under-Construction-042012.aspx

I’m experiencing a sudden, unexplained desire to move to the midwest…

Anatomy of the Ear by Victor P. Eroschenko.

Anatomy of the Ear by Victor P. Eroschenko.

Mitomycin, an anti-cancer drug, at 10x magnification. By Margaret Oechsli, of Jewish Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky. Won 7th place in the 2008&#160;Nikon Small World Competition.

Mitomycin, an anti-cancer drug, at 10x magnification. By Margaret Oechsli, of Jewish Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky. Won 7th place in the 2008 Nikon Small World Competition.