dergrossekrieg:

Dunlop Cycle Tires, 1914 
(by Bart King)

dergrossekrieg:

Dunlop Cycle Tires, 1914 

(by Bart King)

dergrossekrieg:

President Woodrow Wilson announcing the break in the official relations with Germany to the United States Congress due to tensions of World War I, on February 3, 1917.

dergrossekrieg:

President Woodrow Wilson announcing the break in the official relations with Germany to the United States Congress due to tensions of World War I, on February 3, 1917.

NASA launched Columbia for the first time on April 12, 1981 with Robert L Crippen and John W Young aboard the space shuttle. During their mission, they orbited Earth 37 times, landing at Edwards Air Force Base in California on April 14. (via)

NASA launched Columbia for the first time on April 12, 1981 with Robert L Crippen and John W Young aboard the space shuttle. During their mission, they orbited Earth 37 times, landing at Edwards Air Force Base in California on April 14. (via)

dergrossekrieg:

Wounded soldiers waiting to be taken to the dressing station. The Battle of the Menin Road was the first major Australian involvement in the series of British ‘bite and hold’ attacks which began on 31 July 1917. Collectively these operations are known as ‘The Third Battle of Ypres’. After moving through Ypres, the First and Second Australian Divisions manned the front lines opposite Glencorse Wood. Following a five-day bombardment, the two Australian divisions advanced at 5.40 am on 20 September. They were in the centre of an assault by 11 British divisions along Westhoek Ridge facing Glencorse Wood. Although this battle was finally won by the allies, the Australians sustained 5,000 killed and wounded.
Via State Library of Queensland, Australia on Flickr

dergrossekrieg:

Wounded soldiers waiting to be taken to the dressing station. 
The Battle of the Menin Road was the first major Australian involvement in the series of British ‘bite and hold’ attacks which began on 31 July 1917. Collectively these operations are known as ‘The Third Battle of Ypres’. After moving through Ypres, the First and Second Australian Divisions manned the front lines opposite Glencorse Wood. Following a five-day bombardment, the two Australian divisions advanced at 5.40 am on 20 September. They were in the centre of an assault by 11 British divisions along Westhoek Ridge facing Glencorse Wood. Although this battle was finally won by the allies, the Australians sustained 5,000 killed and wounded.

Via State Library of Queensland, Australia on Flickr

On July 15th, 1975, despite their nations’ rivalry both politically and in space exploration, Soviet and American mission commanders Alexey Leonov and Tom Stafford exchanged the first international handshake in space, while their respective Soyuz and Apollo spacecrafts were docked together for a period of two days. (via)

On July 15th, 1975, despite their nations’ rivalry both politically and in space exploration, Soviet and American mission commanders Alexey Leonov and Tom Stafford exchanged the first international handshake in space, while their respective Soyuz and Apollo spacecrafts were docked together for a period of two days. (via)

History of Space Exploration
After the Soviet Union launched their first space station, the Salyut I, in April of 1971, the United States retaliating by launching their first experimental space station, Skylab, on May 14th, 1973. It’s use was short-lived, as less than a year later, in February of 1974, it is abandoned, remaining in Earth’s orbit until it crashes into western Australia in July of 1979.

History of Space Exploration

After the Soviet Union launched their first space station, the Salyut I, in April of 1971, the United States retaliating by launching their first experimental space station, Skylab, on May 14th, 1973. It’s use was short-lived, as less than a year later, in February of 1974, it is abandoned, remaining in Earth’s orbit until it crashes into western Australia in July of 1979.

“If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician. I often think in music. I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music …I get most joy in life out of music.”
-Albert Einstein

If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician. I often think in music. I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music …I get most joy in life out of music.”

-Albert Einstein

dotdaniel:


This is the oldest known photograph of a human being in existence. It depends on how one defines photograph, but this was taken by Louis Jacques-Mande Daguerre in 1838. (The fellow the daguerreotype was named after.) This is a photo of the Boulevard du Temple in Paris. This is a busy street and there was a lot of traffic, but since the exposure was so long, about 15-20 minutes, none of the moving figures can be seen. Only one man shows up. Who was this nameless gentleman? No one knows. I’m sure they never imagined that they had been immortalised, albeit anonymously, by a clever scientist testing his newly discovered method of preserving moments in time…

dotdaniel:

This is the oldest known photograph of a human being in existence. It depends on how one defines photograph, but this was taken by Louis Jacques-Mande Daguerre in 1838. (The fellow the daguerreotype was named after.) This is a photo of the Boulevard du Temple in Paris. This is a busy street and there was a lot of traffic, but since the exposure was so long, about 15-20 minutes, none of the moving figures can be seen. Only one man shows up. Who was this nameless gentleman? No one knows. I’m sure they never imagined that they had been immortalised, albeit anonymously, by a clever scientist testing his newly discovered method of preserving moments in time…

History of Space Exploration
On March 2nd, 1972, Pioneer 10 is launched on its unmanned journey to travel through the asteroid belt and make direct observations of Jupiter, passing the gas planet in December 1973. Pioneer 10 was both the first craft to successfully maneuver through the asteroid belt and, by most definitions, leave the solar system. However, in January of 2003, it ceased to send further communications, while 7.6 billion miles from Earth.

History of Space Exploration

On March 2nd, 1972, Pioneer 10 is launched on its unmanned journey to travel through the asteroid belt and make direct observations of Jupiter, passing the gas planet in December 1973. Pioneer 10 was both the first craft to successfully maneuver through the asteroid belt and, by most definitions, leave the solar system. However, in January of 2003, it ceased to send further communications, while 7.6 billion miles from Earth.

We Are the Explorers

As submitted by lonecenturion:

We Are the Explorers (video) 

Read More

History of Space Exploration

On April 11, 1970,  James A. Lovell, John L “Jack” Swigert and Fred W Haise, are launched on another voyage to the moon, upon the Apollo 13. However, just two days into the mission, a fault in the electrical system produces an explosion in an oxygen tank, leading to a loss of electrical power and failure of both oxygen tanks. Upon re-entering the Earth’s atmosphere and splashing into the ocean, the crew resourcefully uses the lunar module as something of a lifeboat.

History of Space Exploration

On July 16, 1969, NASA launched the Apollo 11, making Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin the first humans to walk on the moon on July 20th, thereby fulfilling JFK’s goal of reaching the moon by the end of the 60s.

Dorothy Hodgkin (1910 – 1994)Pictured here with Linus Paulding 

Dorothy Crowfoot (Hodgkin, after her 1937 marriage) was born in Cairo, Egypt, to a pair of British archaeologists. She was sent home to England for school, where she was one of only two girls who were allowed to study chemistry with the boys. At 18, she enrolled in one of Oxford’s women’s colleges and studied chemistry and then moved to Cambridge to study X-ray crystallography, a type of imaging that uses X-rays to determine a molecule’s three-dimensional structure. She returned to Oxford in 1934, where she would spend most of her working life, teaching chemistry and using X-ray crystallography to study interesting biological molecules. She spent years perfecting the technique, for which she was awarded a Nobel Prize in 1964, and determined the structures of penicillin, vitamin B12 and insulin. In 2010, 16 years after her death, the British Royal Mail celebrated the 350th anniversary of the Royal Society by issuing stamps with the likenesses of 10 of the society’s most illustrious members, including Isaac Newton and Benjamin Franklin; Hodgkin was the only woman in the group.

Dorothy Hodgkin (1910 – 1994)
Pictured here with Linus Paulding 

Dorothy Crowfoot (Hodgkin, after her 1937 marriage) was born in Cairo, Egypt, to a pair of British archaeologists. She was sent home to England for school, where she was one of only two girls who were allowed to study chemistry with the boys. At 18, she enrolled in one of Oxford’s women’s colleges and studied chemistry and then moved to Cambridge to study X-ray crystallography, a type of imaging that uses X-rays to determine a molecule’s three-dimensional structure. She returned to Oxford in 1934, where she would spend most of her working life, teaching chemistry and using X-ray crystallography to study interesting biological molecules. She spent years perfecting the technique, for which she was awarded a Nobel Prize in 1964, and determined the structures of penicillin, vitamin B12 and insulin. In 2010, 16 years after her death, the British Royal Mail celebrated the 350th anniversary of the Royal Society by issuing stamps with the likenesses of 10 of the society’s most illustrious members, including Isaac Newton and Benjamin Franklin; Hodgkin was the only woman in the group.

Barbara McClintock (1902 – 1992)

While studying botany at Cornell University in the 1920s, Barbara McClintock got her first taste of genetics and was hooked. As she earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees and moved into postdoctoral work, she pioneered the study of genetics of maize (corn) cells. She pursued her research at universities in California, Missouri and Germany before finding a permanent home at Cold Spring Harbor in New York. It was there that, after observing the patterns of coloration of maize kernels over generations of plants, she determined that genes could move within and between chromosomes. The finding didn’t fit in with conventional thinking on genetics, however, and was largely ignored; McClintock began studying the origins of maize in South America. But after improved molecular techniques that became available in the 1970s and early 1980s confirmed her theory and these “jumping genes” were found in microorganisms, insects and even humans, McClintock was awarded a Lasker Prize in 1981 and Nobel Prize in 1983.

Barbara McClintock (1902 – 1992)

While studying botany at Cornell University in the 1920s, Barbara McClintock got her first taste of genetics and was hooked. As she earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees and moved into postdoctoral work, she pioneered the study of genetics of maize (corn) cells. She pursued her research at universities in California, Missouri and Germany before finding a permanent home at Cold Spring Harbor in New York. It was there that, after observing the patterns of coloration of maize kernels over generations of plants, she determined that genes could move within and between chromosomes. The finding didn’t fit in with conventional thinking on genetics, however, and was largely ignored; McClintock began studying the origins of maize in South America. But after improved molecular techniques that became available in the 1970s and early 1980s confirmed her theory and these “jumping genes” were found in microorganisms, insects and even humans, McClintock was awarded a Lasker Prize in 1981 and Nobel Prize in 1983.