A scorpionfish (Rhinopias eschmeyeri) in Bali, Indonesia, by Rockford Draper of University of Texas at Dallas.

A scorpionfish (Rhinopias eschmeyeri) in Bali, Indonesia, by Rockford Draper of University of Texas at Dallas.

Pictured above is the Harlequin Shrimp (hymenocera elegant). While their native environment is in the waters off of Indonesia, they are commonly found in fishtanks for their beautiful colorations.  However they are extremely hard to care for, as they only eat live starfish and sea urchins.

Pictured above is the Harlequin Shrimp (hymenocera elegant). While their native environment is in the waters off of Indonesia, they are commonly found in fishtanks for their beautiful colorations.  However they are extremely hard to care for, as they only eat live starfish and sea urchins.


The name and appearance of the Komodo dragon is straight out of legend. In reality these are huge, heavily-built monitor lizards - the biggest lizards in the world. The largest accurately recorded dragon was 3.1m long and a weighty 166kg. It was once thought that Komodos used deadly saliva containing toxic bacteria to poison their prey. Studies have now shown that they are venomous. Glands in the jaw secrete a complex mix of toxic substances into a wound made by the dragon’s teeth. Komodo dragons are at the top of the food chain on their Indonesian island homes of Komodo, Rinca and Flores.

The name and appearance of the Komodo dragon is straight out of legend. In reality these are huge, heavily-built monitor lizards - the biggest lizards in the world. The largest accurately recorded dragon was 3.1m long and a weighty 166kg. It was once thought that Komodos used deadly saliva containing toxic bacteria to poison their prey. Studies have now shown that they are venomous. Glands in the jaw secrete a complex mix of toxic substances into a wound made by the dragon’s teeth. Komodo dragons are at the top of the food chain on their Indonesian island homes of Komodo, Rinca and Flores.

Powerful quake hits off western Indonesia

A powerful earthquake hit waters off western Indonesia early Wednesday, prompting officials to issue a tsunami warning. There were no immediate reports of injuries or damage.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake had a preliminary magnitude of 7.3 and struck 260 miles (420 kilometers) off the coast of Aceh province. It was centered 18 miles (30 kilometers) beneath the ocean floor.

Residents in the provincial capital, Banda Aceh, and other cities along the coast poured into the streets after being rattled from their sleep.

Arief Akhir, an official with Indonesia's geological agency, said a tsunami warning had been issued. But more than an hour after the quake, there were no signs of seismically triggered waves.

Gorgeous Gravity
These waves between Indonesia (top) and the coast of Australia (bottom) aren’t caused by wind. They’re a direct result of gravity. The pattern is of atmospheric gravity waves playing on the surface of the ocean. Atmospheric gravity waves form when buoyancy pushes air up, and gravity pulls it back down. As the air descends in to the low point of the atmospheric wave, it touches the ocean surface, causing rough waters, visible here as long, dark vertical lines. The brighter regions show the crests of the atmospheric waves, because there, the water is calm and reflective.

Gorgeous Gravity

These waves between Indonesia (top) and the coast of Australia (bottom) aren’t caused by wind. They’re a direct result of gravity. 

The pattern is of atmospheric gravity waves playing on the surface of the ocean. Atmospheric gravity waves form when buoyancy pushes air up, and gravity pulls it back down. As the air descends in to the low point of the atmospheric wave, it touches the ocean surface, causing rough waters, visible here as long, dark vertical lines. The brighter regions show the crests of the atmospheric waves, because there, the water is calm and reflective.