An image of radiolaria composed by stacking 160 focus points. (by Maximal2Personen)

An image of radiolaria composed by stacking 160 focus points. (by Maximal2Personen)

Atlanta peronii (gastropod mollusk), at 170x magnification, by Peter Parks of Witney, Oxon, United Kingdom. This image won an honorable mention in the 2007 Nikon Small World Competition.

Atlanta peronii (gastropod mollusk), at 170x magnification, by Peter Parks of Witney, Oxon, United Kingdom. This image won an honorable mention in the 2007 Nikon Small World Competition.

Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, as seen on cultures of cotton-tail rabbit epithelium cells. (Via the CDC)

Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, as seen on cultures of cotton-tail rabbit epithelium cells. (Via the CDC)

According to the Center for Disease Control:

This digitally-colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of an untreated water specimen extracted from a wild stream mainly used to control flooding during inclement weather, revealed the presence of unidentified organisms, which included bacteria, protozoa, and algae. In this particular view, a microorganism is featured, the exterior of which is covered by numerous projections imparting an appearance of a sea urchin. This microscopic “pin cushion” was tethered to its surroundings by a biofilm within which many bacteria, and amoeboid protozoa could be seen enmeshed as well. 

According to the Center for Disease Control:

This digitally-colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of an untreated water specimen extracted from a wild stream mainly used to control flooding during inclement weather, revealed the presence of unidentified organisms, which included bacteria, protozoa, and algae. In this particular view, a microorganism is featured, the exterior of which is covered by numerous projections imparting an appearance of a sea urchin. This microscopic “pin cushion” was tethered to its surroundings by a biofilm within which many bacteria, and amoeboid protozoa could be seen enmeshed as well. 

Unpolished, 150 million year-old agatized dinosaur bone cells at 42x magnification. By Douglas Moore of University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point.This image won 10th place in the 2011 Nikon Small World Competition. 

Unpolished, 150 million year-old agatized dinosaur bone cells at 42x magnification. By Douglas Moore of University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point.
This image won 10th place in the 2011 Nikon Small World Competition. 

In this scanning electron micrograph, a small cancerous tumor covered in microvilli, microscopic hairlike structures which enable absorption and secretion, is shown within a human lung. (via National Geographic)

In this scanning electron micrograph, a small cancerous tumor covered in microvilli, microscopic hairlike structures which enable absorption and secretion, is shown within a human lung. (via National Geographic)

Mast cell within collagen fibers in a human eye with conjunctivitis, at 7000x magnification. by Donald Pottle of The Schepens Eye Research Institute

Mast cell within collagen fibers in a human eye with conjunctivitis, at 7000x magnification. 
by Donald Pottle of The Schepens Eye Research Institute

magnified-world:

Rostellar hook arrangement of a tapeworm at 30x magnification.  19th place Nikon Small World Competition.

magnified-world:

Rostellar hook arrangement of a tapeworm at 30x magnification.  19th place Nikon Small World Competition.

Chloroplasts in mesophyll cells, with cyan representing proteins and red representing chlorophyll (by Fernan Federici)

Chloroplasts in mesophyll cells, with cyan representing proteins and red representing chlorophyll (by Fernan Federici)

Hepatitus A virus (HAV) by Sanofi Pasteur on Flickr.
Hepatitis A virus (HVA) causes acute inflammation of the liver and is the most common of all forms of viral hepatitis.

Hepatitus A virus (HAV) by Sanofi Pasteur on Flickr.


Hepatitis A virus (HVA) causes acute inflammation of the liver and is the most common of all forms of viral hepatitis.

Seen here is the cells of the largest organ in the human body: the skin. This scanning electron micrograph shows the epidermis, which is the tough, outermost coating of the skin, formed by overlapping layers of dead skin cells that are continuously removed and replaced by the living cells underneath. (via)

Seen here is the cells of the largest organ in the human body: the skin. This scanning electron micrograph shows the epidermis, which is the tough, outermost coating of the skin, formed by overlapping layers of dead skin cells that are continuously removed and replaced by the living cells underneath. (via)

Via the Center for Disease Control:

This transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed the ultrastructural appearance of a number of virus particles, or “virions”, of a hantavirus known as the Sin Nombre virus (SNV).
In November 1993, the specific hantavirus that caused the Four Corners outbreak was isolated. Using tissue from a deer mouse that had been trapped near the New Mexico home of a person who had gotten the disease, the Special Pathogens Branch at CDC grew the virus in the laboratory. Shortly afterwards, and independently, the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) also grew the virus, from a person in New Mexico, who had gotten the disease, as well as from a mouse trapped in California.
The new virus was called Muerto Canyon virus, later changed to Sin Nombre virus (SNV), and the new disease caused by the virus was named hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, or HPS.

Side note: I find it hilarious that it is named the “nameless virus”

Via the Center for Disease Control:

This transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed the ultrastructural appearance of a number of virus particles, or “virions”, of a hantavirus known as the Sin Nombre virus (SNV).

In November 1993, the specific hantavirus that caused the Four Corners outbreak was isolated. Using tissue from a deer mouse that had been trapped near the New Mexico home of a person who had gotten the disease, the Special Pathogens Branch at CDC grew the virus in the laboratory. Shortly afterwards, and independently, the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) also grew the virus, from a person in New Mexico, who had gotten the disease, as well as from a mouse trapped in California.

The new virus was called Muerto Canyon virus, later changed to Sin Nombre virus (SNV), and the new disease caused by the virus was named hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, or HPS.

Side note: I find it hilarious that it is named the “nameless virus”

Via the Center for Disease Control:

This transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by norovirus virions, or virus particles.
Noroviruses belong to the genus Norovirus, and the family Caliciviridae. They are a group of related, single-stranded RNA, nonenveloped viruses that cause acute gastroenteritis in humans. Norovirus was recently approved as the official genus name for the group of viruses provisionally described as “Norwalk-like viruses” (NLV). See PHIL 10703 for a black and white version of this image.
The symptoms of norovirus illness usually include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and some stomach cramping. Sometimes people additionally have a low-grade fever, chills, headache, muscle aches, and a general sense of tiredness. The illness often begins suddenly, and the infected person may feel very sick. In most people the illness is self-limiting with symptoms lasting for about 1 or 2 days. In general, children experience more vomiting than adults.

Via the Center for Disease Control:

This transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by norovirus virions, or virus particles.

Noroviruses belong to the genus Norovirus, and the family Caliciviridae. They are a group of related, single-stranded RNA, nonenveloped viruses that cause acute gastroenteritis in humans. Norovirus was recently approved as the official genus name for the group of viruses provisionally described as “Norwalk-like viruses” (NLV). See PHIL 10703 for a black and white version of this image.

The symptoms of norovirus illness usually include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and some stomach cramping. Sometimes people additionally have a low-grade fever, chills, headache, muscle aches, and a general sense of tiredness. The illness often begins suddenly, and the infected person may feel very sick. In most people the illness is self-limiting with symptoms lasting for about 1 or 2 days. In general, children experience more vomiting than adults.

Via the Center for Disease Control:

This 1995 transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphologic changes in this tissue sample isolate brought on due to an Ebola hemorrhagic fever infection, including the presence of numbers of Ebola virions.
Ebola hemorrhagic fever (Ebola HF) is a severe, often-fatal disease in humans and nonhuman primates (monkeys, gorillas, and chimpanzees) that has appeared sporadically since its initial recognition in 1976.
The disease is caused by infection with Ebola virus, named after a river in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire) in Africa, where it was first recognized. The virus is one of two members of a family of RNA viruses called the Filoviridae. There are four identified subtypes of Ebola virus. Three of the four have caused disease in humans: Ebola-Zaire, Ebola-Sudan, and Ebola-Ivory Coast. The fourth, Ebola-Reston, has caused disease in nonhuman primates, but not in humans.

Via the Center for Disease Control:

This 1995 transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphologic changes in this tissue sample isolate brought on due to an Ebola hemorrhagic fever infection, including the presence of numbers of Ebola virions.

Ebola hemorrhagic fever (Ebola HF) is a severe, often-fatal disease in humans and nonhuman primates (monkeys, gorillas, and chimpanzees) that has appeared sporadically since its initial recognition in 1976.

The disease is caused by infection with Ebola virus, named after a river in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire) in Africa, where it was first recognized. The virus is one of two members of a family of RNA viruses called the Filoviridae. There are four identified subtypes of Ebola virus. Three of the four have caused disease in humans: Ebola-Zaire, Ebola-Sudan, and Ebola-Ivory Coast. The fourth, Ebola-Reston, has caused disease in nonhuman primates, but not in humans.