organicmommy:

My little scientist

organicmommy:

My little scientist


Hydrogen Orbital Cookies

I’m going to make these yes yes yes

Hydrogen Orbital Cookies

I’m going to make these yes yes yes

totalimmortalbeloved:

Antique English surgical instruments and case, circa 1650.

totalimmortalbeloved:

Antique English surgical instruments and case, circa 1650.

approachingsignificance:

approachingsignificance:

DNA 11: Personal DNA Portraits

Is this narcissistic, or science appreciation? I couldn’t sleep with a painting or photo of myself above me, but the thought of my DNA above me doesn’t trigger the same reaction. 

I wouldn’t want this in my bedroom, but kitchen? HELL YES. It will go nicely with my beaker  dinner glasses, petri dish plates, and periodic table table.

First nail art photo I think I could get into….

First nail art photo I think I could get into….

staceythinx:

The food chain as illustrated by Thomas Sullivan

It’s probably bad that I’m too busy noticing the inaccuracies in these to appreciate how awesome they are otherwise.

theatlantic:

At the Restaurant of the Future, This Gadget Could Replace Your Waiter

With no instructions, I order the two items through the Presto. Beautifully lit photos let me see what I’m going to get. The UI is intuitive. Within 20 seconds, I’ve sent my order to the kitchen. Before we’d even finished eating, I swiped my card slightly awkwardly into the built-in payment slot, added a tip, and settled up. I would not say that this machine will blow your mind with its technical capabilities, but that’s exactly the point: It just works. 
I cannot say for sure that this will be The Future of your restaurant experience, but after talking with E la Carte co-founder Rajat Suri, I’m convinced that some sort of automated ordering system will make its way into your dining experiences. And it’s not because the technology is cool or whizbang or will draw customers. The real reasons are completely economic.
“It costs about a dollar a day per table, it can even go lower depending on if you have sponsors involved because all the alcohol companies want to get involved,” Suri says. “For that, they get about $6 a day per tablet in increased sales. That’s extra desserts, appetizers, drinks. They get about another $5 in extra table turns. If you can fit in one more table per night, that’s worth a lot of money. And some restaurants, though not Calafia, get about $4, $5 extra because they choose to save labor.”
Read more.


As a waitress, I say screw that. As a customer, I say FINALLY.

theatlantic:

At the Restaurant of the Future, This Gadget Could Replace Your Waiter

With no instructions, I order the two items through the Presto. Beautifully lit photos let me see what I’m going to get. The UI is intuitive. Within 20 seconds, I’ve sent my order to the kitchen. Before we’d even finished eating, I swiped my card slightly awkwardly into the built-in payment slot, added a tip, and settled up. I would not say that this machine will blow your mind with its technical capabilities, but that’s exactly the point: It just works. 

I cannot say for sure that this will be The Future of your restaurant experience, but after talking with E la Carte co-founder Rajat Suri, I’m convinced that some sort of automated ordering system will make its way into your dining experiences. And it’s not because the technology is cool or whizbang or will draw customers. The real reasons are completely economic.

“It costs about a dollar a day per table, it can even go lower depending on if you have sponsors involved because all the alcohol companies want to get involved,” Suri says. “For that, they get about $6 a day per tablet in increased sales. That’s extra desserts, appetizers, drinks. They get about another $5 in extra table turns. If you can fit in one more table per night, that’s worth a lot of money. And some restaurants, though not Calafia, get about $4, $5 extra because they choose to save labor.”

Read more.

As a waitress, I say screw that. As a customer, I say FINALLY.

relright:

natural swimming pools

uses plants to filter the water instead of chemicals

bridal-belles:


Amazing science themed wedding at a museum! 

OH MY GOODNESS MY FUTURE WEDDING PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE

bridal-belles:

Amazing science themed wedding at a museum! 

OH MY GOODNESS MY FUTURE WEDDING PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE

This bizarre cube is the Cryoscope Haptic Weathervane, created by Robb Godshaw of Syyn Labs. Basically its sole purpose is to provide another way to accurately determine the temperature outside, without attempting to decode degrees or heading outdoors. It has an Arduino processor inside which raises or lowers the temperature of the surface of the cube to the precise temperature of the outside air. Now you can decide what to wear just as easily as you can hit the snooze button from your bed! (via)

This bizarre cube is the Cryoscope Haptic Weathervane, created by Robb Godshaw of Syyn Labs. Basically its sole purpose is to provide another way to accurately determine the temperature outside, without attempting to decode degrees or heading outdoors. It has an Arduino processor inside which raises or lowers the temperature of the surface of the cube to the precise temperature of the outside air. Now you can decide what to wear just as easily as you can hit the snooze button from your bed! (via)

arsvivendi:

Moss Shower Mat
This bathroom mat is made of imputrescible foam called plastazote. Each cell contains a piece of moss. The mat contains a total of 70 pieces of ball, island and forest moss. The humidity of the bathroom and the drops flowing from the body water the mosses.

WHAT I REALLY WANT THIS FOREVER I DONT KNOW WHY I SAID FOREVER I’M JUST REALLY ENTHUSIASTIC ABOUT THIS RUG

arsvivendi:

Moss Shower Mat

This bathroom mat is made of imputrescible foam called plastazote. Each cell contains a piece of moss. The mat contains a total of 70 pieces of ball, island and forest moss. The humidity of the bathroom and the drops flowing from the body water the mosses.

WHAT I REALLY WANT THIS FOREVER I DONT KNOW WHY I SAID FOREVER I’M JUST REALLY ENTHUSIASTIC ABOUT THIS RUG

Resin cast of the lungs displaying the branching out of bronchi, in addition to the pulmonary arteries and trachea. The bronchi and pulmonary arteries work together in using inhaled air to oxygenate blood and exhale carbon dioxide.Photograph by Martin Dohrn.

Resin cast of the lungs displaying the branching out of bronchi, in addition to the pulmonary arteries and trachea. The bronchi and pulmonary arteries work together in using inhaled air to oxygenate blood and exhale carbon dioxide.
Photograph by Martin Dohrn.

Meteorite Pop-Art

Scientists use X-rays, dyes, fancy microscopes and other tools to see things we can’t capture with our naked eyes. But these tools aren’t just good for science, they can make art. An exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History explores the beauty in scientific imaging. These pictures illustrate the chemical composition of four meteorites, which was detected by scanning them with a beam of electrons. Red represents magnesium, green is calcium, and blue is aluminum.

Meteorite Pop-Art

Scientists use X-rays, dyes, fancy microscopes and other tools to see things we can’t capture with our naked eyes. But these tools aren’t just good for science, they can make art. An exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History explores the beauty in scientific imaging. These pictures illustrate the chemical composition of four meteorites, which was detected by scanning them with a beam of electrons. Red represents magnesium, green is calcium, and blue is aluminum.