The Buddy System: Two Fish Swimming Side-by-Side by Birgitt Boschitsch ‘13, Peter Dewey (GS), Alexander Smits (fac) of the Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Princeton University. (As seen in Princeton’s Art of Science 2010 Gallery.)

In developing next-generation autonomous underwater vehicles we look for inspiration from the intelligent designs observed in nature.
For this image, two artificial fish fins are placed side-by-side and flapped in-phase with each another as water flows past the fins (flow direction is up). Small hydrogen bubbles (the white part of the image) allow for the wake of the fins to be visualized. The interaction of the fins creates two repeating patterns of swirling vortices known as vortex streets.

The Buddy System: Two Fish Swimming Side-by-Side by Birgitt Boschitsch ‘13, Peter Dewey (GS), Alexander Smits (fac) of the Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Princeton University. (As seen in Princeton’s Art of Science 2010 Gallery.)

In developing next-generation autonomous underwater vehicles we look for inspiration from the intelligent designs observed in nature.

For this image, two artificial fish fins are placed side-by-side and flapped in-phase with each another as water flows past the fins (flow direction is up). Small hydrogen bubbles (the white part of the image) allow for the wake of the fins to be visualized. The interaction of the fins creates two repeating patterns of swirling vortices known as vortex streets.

YES. Moping has never been both so nostalgic and enjoyable.

Magnesium wire inside glass case. The magnesium is ignited to illuminate as the flash for use in vintage cameras. (via BOB008)

Magnesium wire inside glass case. The magnesium is ignited to illuminate as the flash for use in vintage cameras. (via BOB008)

vantagelearningblog:

The closest you can get to the 4th dimension on your computer screen.

vantagelearningblog:

The closest you can get to the 4th dimension on your computer screen.

Computer rendering of a collision of two beams of gold ions in the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The beams travel in opposite directions at nearly the speed of light before colliding. (by Brookhaven National Laboratory)

Computer rendering of a collision of two beams of gold ions in the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The beams travel in opposite directions at nearly the speed of light before colliding. (by Brookhaven National Laboratory)

Absorption images of a magneto-optically trapped atoms getting pushed by a laser from the right. (by abraham.olson)

Geothermal power uses the thermal energy generated and stored in the Earth to heat water, which is then used to turn a turbine of a generator, thus producing electricity. Technologies in use include dry steam power plants, flash steam power plants and binary cycle power plants. Descriptions of each:

  1. Dry steam power plants utilize a well sunk deep into the Earth to make steam from the heated ground. The steam then travels up a pipe, into a turbine, which turns a generator to produce electricity. This is the oldest type of plant used. The first one was built in 1904 in Lardarello, Italy, and is still in use today. It is also used at The Geysers, an American geothermal power plant that is the largest one of its kind in use today. (photo source)
  2. Flash steam power plants pump super heated water at high pressure up from a deep well and into the plant on the surface. Once the water is in the plant it is brought down to normal atmospheric pressure so it turns to steam that is used to turn turbines. The key is that the water is then cooled and returned down to be heated again at the bottom of the well so energy from active areas without very much water are still able to be harnessed. (photo source)
  3. Binary cycle power plants use closed loop systems of fluids which limits the emissions from the geological formation. The hot water harnessed from deep in the well is pumped into a heat exchanger where it heats the other liquid into a steam before being returned to the formation to allow it to be reheated. The secondary steam is used to operate the turbines and is also on a closed loop to limit possible emissions. (photo source)
“If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician. I often think in music. I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music …I get most joy in life out of music.”
-Albert Einstein

If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician. I often think in music. I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music …I get most joy in life out of music.”

-Albert Einstein

If you have 10 minutes spare, here is another thing I think you may like…

As submitted by mileswayward:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhGuXCuDb1U

In the confines of a London dinner party, comedian Tim Minchin argues with a hippy named Storm. While Storm herself may not be converted, audiences from London to LA have been won over by Tim’s wordplay and the timely message of the film in a society where science and reason are portrayed as the enemy of belief.

Enjoy =)

Here’s the embed of the video:

Read More

A sculpture by Luca Pozzi based on the String Theory, which will be featured in the Higher Atlas exhibition, at the Marrakech Biennale, from February 29th to June 3rd. Read More

A sculpture by Luca Pozzi based on the String Theory, which will be featured in the Higher Atlas exhibition, at the Marrakech Biennale, from February 29th to June 3rd. Read More

thewalrusisagod said:

Does wind power really have “under-rated potential”? I’ve read before (can’t cite sources, so I’m not sure as to the accuracy) that, at least a decade or so ago and depending on the climate, it might take more energy to create/maintain them in working order than they could generate, long-term (repairs, replacement blades, etc.) and that they couldn’t operate without subsidies (at that time, at least). I also know, from my high school physics ventures, that making a reasonably efficient wind-powered generator is *not* easily done. 

I guess I’m really un-informed about wind power, though.

Read More

Lise Meitner (1878 – 1968)As seen here with Otto Hahn 

When Lise Meitner finished school at age 14, she was barred from higher education, as were all girls in Austria. But, inspired by the discoveries of William Röntgen and Henri Becquerel, she was determined to study radioactivity. When she turned 21, women were finally allowed into Austrian universities. Two years of tutoring preceded her enrollment at the University of Vienna; there she excelled in math and physics and earned her doctorate in 1906. She wrote to Marie Curie, but there was no room for her in the Paris lab and so Meitner made her way to Berlin. There she collaborated with Otto Hahn on the study of radioactive elements, but as an Austrian Jewish woman (all three qualities were strikes against her), she was excluded from the main labs and lectures and allowed to work only in the basement. In 1912, the pair moved to a new university and Meitner had better lab facilities. Though their partnership was split up physically when she was forced to flee Nazi Germany in 1938, they continued to collaborate. Meitner continued her work in Sweden and after Hahn discovered that uranium atoms were split when bombarded with neutrons, she calculated the energy released in the reaction and named the phenomenon “nuclear fission.” The discovery—which eventually led to the atomic bomb (“You must not blame scientists for the use to which war technicians have put our discoveries,” Meitner would say in 1945)—won Hahn the Nobel Prize in 1944. Meitner, overlooked by the Nobel committee, refused to return to Germany after the war and continued her atomic research in Stockholm into her 80s.

Lise Meitner (1878 – 1968)
As seen here with Otto Hahn 

When Lise Meitner finished school at age 14, she was barred from higher education, as were all girls in Austria. But, inspired by the discoveries of William Röntgen and Henri Becquerel, she was determined to study radioactivity. When she turned 21, women were finally allowed into Austrian universities. Two years of tutoring preceded her enrollment at the University of Vienna; there she excelled in math and physics and earned her doctorate in 1906. She wrote to Marie Curie, but there was no room for her in the Paris lab and so Meitner made her way to Berlin. There she collaborated with Otto Hahn on the study of radioactive elements, but as an Austrian Jewish woman (all three qualities were strikes against her), she was excluded from the main labs and lectures and allowed to work only in the basement. In 1912, the pair moved to a new university and Meitner had better lab facilities. Though their partnership was split up physically when she was forced to flee Nazi Germany in 1938, they continued to collaborate. Meitner continued her work in Sweden and after Hahn discovered that uranium atoms were split when bombarded with neutrons, she calculated the energy released in the reaction and named the phenomenon “nuclear fission.” The discovery—which eventually led to the atomic bomb (“You must not blame scientists for the use to which war technicians have put our discoveries,” Meitner would say in 1945)—won Hahn the Nobel Prize in 1944. Meitner, overlooked by the Nobel committee, refused to return to Germany after the war and continued her atomic research in Stockholm into her 80s.

What is the Scientific Method?

As submitted by mileswayward:

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the evolution of the Scientific Method, the systematic and analytical approach to scientific thought in a BBC broadcast:

In 1620 the great philosopher and scientist Francis Bacon published the Novum Organum, a work outlining a new system of thought which he believed should inform all enquiry into the laws of nature. Philosophers before him had given their attention to the reasoning that underlies scientific enquiry; but Bacon’s emphasis on observation and experience is often seen today as giving rise to a new phenomenon: the scientific method.

The scientific method, and the logical processes on which it is based, became a topic of intense debate in the seventeenth century, and thinkers including Isaac Newton, Thomas Huxley and Karl Popper all made important contributions. Some of the greatest discoveries of the modern age were informed by their work, although even today the term ‘scientific method’ remains difficult to define.

expose-the-light:

We’re on the verge of two world-changing antimatter discoveries
While the Large Hadron Collider is looking for the Higgs boson, we’re on the verge of two huge antimatter-related breakthroughs. One could finally solve the  universe’s oldest mystery, while the other could reveal strange new  particles that are perfect for quantum computers.
Read here

expose-the-light:

We’re on the verge of two world-changing antimatter discoveries

While the Large Hadron Collider is looking for the Higgs boson, we’re on the verge of two huge antimatter-related breakthroughs. One could finally solve the universe’s oldest mystery, while the other could reveal strange new particles that are perfect for quantum computers.

Read here