The beating heart of a two day-old zebrafish (or Danio rerio) at 20x magnification. This gif was made from a video by Michael Weber, which received an honorable mention in the 2012 Nikon Small World in Motion competition.

The beating heart of a two day-old zebrafish (or Danio rerio) at 20x magnification. This gif was made from a video by Michael Weber, which received an honorable mention in the 2012 Nikon Small World in Motion competition.

An image of radiolaria composed by stacking 160 focus points. (by Maximal2Personen)

An image of radiolaria composed by stacking 160 focus points. (by Maximal2Personen)

An aluminothermic reaction with iron (III) oxide. In this particular thermite reaction, a magnesium ribbon was used to ignite the mixture within a glass jar. What appear to be sparks flying outwards are actually globules of molten iron.

An aluminothermic reaction with iron (III) oxide. In this particular thermite reaction, a magnesium ribbon was used to ignite the mixture within a glass jar. What appear to be sparks flying outwards are actually globules of molten iron.

I would like to introduce you to your vocal folds, which are more commonly known as your vocal chords. Seen here, starting at a low pitch and raising to a high pitch.
As labeled by Gray’s Anatomy: 
You can also see these vocal chords in action, as they sing the first few measures of the Star Spangled Banner!

I would like to introduce you to your vocal folds, which are more commonly known as your vocal chords. Seen here, starting at a low pitch and raising to a high pitch.

As labeled by Gray’s Anatomy:
image 

You can also see these vocal chords in action, as they sing the first few measures of the Star Spangled Banner!

Brains as Clear as Jello for Scientists to Explore

Scientists at Stanford University reported on Wednesday that they have made a whole mouse brain, and part of a human brain, transparent so that networks of neurons that receive and send information can be highlighted in stunning color and viewed in all their three-dimensional complexity without slicing up the organ.
Even more important, experts say, is that unlike earlier methods for making the tissue of brains and other organs transparent, the new process, called Clarity by its inventors, preserves the biochemistry of the brain so well that researchers can test it over and over again with chemicals that highlight specific structures and provide clues to past activity. The researchers say this process may help uncover the physical underpinnings of devastating mental disorders like schizophrenia, autism, post-traumatic stress disorder and others.

The image above shows a mouse brain was made transparent through this process and later dyed.
Read More

Brains as Clear as Jello for Scientists to Explore

Scientists at Stanford University reported on Wednesday that they have made a whole mouse brain, and part of a human brain, transparent so that networks of neurons that receive and send information can be highlighted in stunning color and viewed in all their three-dimensional complexity without slicing up the organ.

Even more important, experts say, is that unlike earlier methods for making the tissue of brains and other organs transparent, the new process, called Clarity by its inventors, preserves the biochemistry of the brain so well that researchers can test it over and over again with chemicals that highlight specific structures and provide clues to past activity. The researchers say this process may help uncover the physical underpinnings of devastating mental disorders like schizophrenia, autism, post-traumatic stress disorder and others.

The image above shows a mouse brain was made transparent through this process and later dyed.

Read More

The Nuss Procedure is a corrective surgery for a disorder called Pectus Excavatum, in which a patient’s breastbone is sunken into the chest, possibly interfering with the functioning of the heart and lungs, in addition to creating a visual “dent” in the chest.
Developed by Dr. Donald Nuss of Children’s Hospital of the Kings Daughters in Norfolk, VA, this procedure inserts a curved metal bar underneath the sternum, for a period of about two to four years, to reposition the bones. 
Side Note/inspiration for this post: I have known two people to have gone through this surgery, including my brother, and due to our location, they both were patients of Dr. Nuss himself.  (And, no, my brother had no trouble going through airport security, but we had a doctor’s note just in case!)

The Nuss Procedure is a corrective surgery for a disorder called Pectus Excavatum, in which a patient’s breastbone is sunken into the chest, possibly interfering with the functioning of the heart and lungs, in addition to creating a visual “dent” in the chest.

Developed by Dr. Donald Nuss of Children’s Hospital of the Kings Daughters in Norfolk, VA, this procedure inserts a curved metal bar underneath the sternum, for a period of about two to four years, to reposition the bones. 

Side Note/inspiration for this post: I have known two people to have gone through this surgery, including my brother, and due to our location, they both were patients of Dr. Nuss himself.  (And, no, my brother had no trouble going through airport security, but we had a doctor’s note just in case!)

Some big fans of seafood may have experienced the bizarre phenomena that takes place when soy sauce is poured on a freshly killed octopus. If the animal is dead, then why do its tentacles writhe about? Discovery’s youtube channel tackles the science behind one of the latest viral videos.

Recrystallized melted mixture of acetanalide, resorcinal and carbon tetra bromide, at 33x magnification. By John Hart of Hart3D Films in Boulder, Colorado. Won 13th place in the 2009 Nikon Small World Competition.

Recrystallized melted mixture of acetanalide, resorcinal and carbon tetra bromide, at 33x magnification. By John Hart of Hart3D Films in Boulder, Colorado. Won 13th place in the 2009 Nikon Small World Competition.

In a new study, zebrafish display signs of fear upon smelling sugar which are identical to their reactions to the pheromones released by other injured fish. Now scientists are speculating that this study could not only hint at the chemical composition of these pheromones, but also the origin of fear in fish and humans.

In the Sawmill Sink in Abaco, the water at a depth of 30 to 26 feet is pigmented by the bacteria. But the real danger lies in the hydrogen sulfide gas, which forces divers to hastily proceed through. Photo by Wes C. Skiles.

In the Sawmill Sink in Abaco, the water at a depth of 30 to 26 feet is pigmented by the bacteria. But the real danger lies in the hydrogen sulfide gas, which forces divers to hastily proceed through. Photo by Wes C. Skiles.

Atlanta peronii (gastropod mollusk), at 170x magnification, by Peter Parks of Witney, Oxon, United Kingdom. This image won an honorable mention in the 2007 Nikon Small World Competition.

Atlanta peronii (gastropod mollusk), at 170x magnification, by Peter Parks of Witney, Oxon, United Kingdom. This image won an honorable mention in the 2007 Nikon Small World Competition.

On December 4th, 1997, NASA launched Pathfinder, an unmanned mission to Mars which arrived seven months later on July 4th, 1997. The rover it carried, Sojourner, explored the red planet for a total of eighty days afterwards.

On December 4th, 1997, NASA launched Pathfinder, an unmanned mission to Mars which arrived seven months later on July 4th, 1997. The rover it carried, Sojourner, explored the red planet for a total of eighty days afterwards.

Trazodone, a common antidepressant, at 100x magnification, by Lars Bech of Naarden, The Netherlands. 

Trazodone, a common antidepressant, at 100x magnification, by Lars Bech of Naarden, The Netherlands. 

Illustrated here is a geologic map of Venus’s northern hemisphere, based off radar data from the Venera 15 and 16 orbiters, Pioneer Venus orbiter, and Earth-based radar telescopes. The colors indicate various features on the surface, such as plains in yellow and light green; mountains in purple, green and blue; and volcanoes in light red and pink. (View More Planetary Maps at the Telegraph)

Illustrated here is a geologic map of Venus’s northern hemisphere, based off radar data from the Venera 15 and 16 orbiters, Pioneer Venus orbiter, and Earth-based radar telescopes. The colors indicate various features on the surface, such as plains in yellow and light green; mountains in purple, green and blue; and volcanoes in light red and pink. (View More Planetary Maps at the Telegraph)

22 years ago today, on April 24th, 1990, NASA launched its Hubble Space Telesecope. However, soon after launch, it is realized that the telescope’s mirror was ground incorrectly, and the flaw was unable to be corrected until December 1993, during a shuttle mission.

22 years ago today, on April 24th, 1990, NASA launched its Hubble Space Telesecope. However, soon after launch, it is realized that the telescope’s mirror was ground incorrectly, and the flaw was unable to be corrected until December 1993, during a shuttle mission.