breakingnews:

World’s smallest movie created by moving individual atoms

AP: IBM says it has made the tiniest stop-motion movie ever - a one-minute video of individual carbon monoxide molecules repeatedly rearranged to show a boy dancing, throwing a ball and bouncing on a trampoline.

Each frame measures 45 by 25 nanometres there are 25 million nanometres in an inch but hugely magnified, the movie is reminiscent of early video games, particularly when the boy bounces the ball off the side of the frame accompanied by simple music and sound effects.

Video: A Boy And His Atom (IBM via YouTube)

I love this! So cute and clever!

22 years ago today, on April 24th, 1990, NASA launched its Hubble Space Telesecope. However, soon after launch, it is realized that the telescope’s mirror was ground incorrectly, and the flaw was unable to be corrected until December 1993, during a shuttle mission.

22 years ago today, on April 24th, 1990, NASA launched its Hubble Space Telesecope. However, soon after launch, it is realized that the telescope’s mirror was ground incorrectly, and the flaw was unable to be corrected until December 1993, during a shuttle mission.

NASA’s longest-serving shuttle, Discovery, was transported from Florida’s Kennedy Space Center atop a Boeing 747 just after dawn this morning. After flying a victory lap around the capitol, it landed at Virginia’s Dulles International Airport, from which it will be moved to the Smithsonian Institution on Thursday.

(Photos via National Geographic)

futurescope:

Dotsies: The Future of reading
new-aesthetic:

Dotsies, via Phil G.

futurescope:

Dotsies: The Future of reading

new-aesthetic:

Dotsies, via Phil G.

kjmichalak:

It’s an elephant using a smartphone. Need I say more?

Magnesium wire inside glass case. The magnesium is ignited to illuminate as the flash for use in vintage cameras. (via BOB008)

Magnesium wire inside glass case. The magnesium is ignited to illuminate as the flash for use in vintage cameras. (via BOB008)

Computer rendering of a collision of two beams of gold ions in the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The beams travel in opposite directions at nearly the speed of light before colliding. (by Brookhaven National Laboratory)

Computer rendering of a collision of two beams of gold ions in the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The beams travel in opposite directions at nearly the speed of light before colliding. (by Brookhaven National Laboratory)

Geothermal power uses the thermal energy generated and stored in the Earth to heat water, which is then used to turn a turbine of a generator, thus producing electricity. Technologies in use include dry steam power plants, flash steam power plants and binary cycle power plants. Descriptions of each:

  1. Dry steam power plants utilize a well sunk deep into the Earth to make steam from the heated ground. The steam then travels up a pipe, into a turbine, which turns a generator to produce electricity. This is the oldest type of plant used. The first one was built in 1904 in Lardarello, Italy, and is still in use today. It is also used at The Geysers, an American geothermal power plant that is the largest one of its kind in use today. (photo source)
  2. Flash steam power plants pump super heated water at high pressure up from a deep well and into the plant on the surface. Once the water is in the plant it is brought down to normal atmospheric pressure so it turns to steam that is used to turn turbines. The key is that the water is then cooled and returned down to be heated again at the bottom of the well so energy from active areas without very much water are still able to be harnessed. (photo source)
  3. Binary cycle power plants use closed loop systems of fluids which limits the emissions from the geological formation. The hot water harnessed from deep in the well is pumped into a heat exchanger where it heats the other liquid into a steam before being returned to the formation to allow it to be reheated. The secondary steam is used to operate the turbines and is also on a closed loop to limit possible emissions. (photo source)
dotdaniel:


This is the oldest known photograph of a human being in existence. It depends on how one defines photograph, but this was taken by Louis Jacques-Mande Daguerre in 1838. (The fellow the daguerreotype was named after.) This is a photo of the Boulevard du Temple in Paris. This is a busy street and there was a lot of traffic, but since the exposure was so long, about 15-20 minutes, none of the moving figures can be seen. Only one man shows up. Who was this nameless gentleman? No one knows. I’m sure they never imagined that they had been immortalised, albeit anonymously, by a clever scientist testing his newly discovered method of preserving moments in time…

dotdaniel:

This is the oldest known photograph of a human being in existence. It depends on how one defines photograph, but this was taken by Louis Jacques-Mande Daguerre in 1838. (The fellow the daguerreotype was named after.) This is a photo of the Boulevard du Temple in Paris. This is a busy street and there was a lot of traffic, but since the exposure was so long, about 15-20 minutes, none of the moving figures can be seen. Only one man shows up. Who was this nameless gentleman? No one knows. I’m sure they never imagined that they had been immortalised, albeit anonymously, by a clever scientist testing his newly discovered method of preserving moments in time…

History of Space Exploration
On March 2nd, 1972, Pioneer 10 is launched on its unmanned journey to travel through the asteroid belt and make direct observations of Jupiter, passing the gas planet in December 1973. Pioneer 10 was both the first craft to successfully maneuver through the asteroid belt and, by most definitions, leave the solar system. However, in January of 2003, it ceased to send further communications, while 7.6 billion miles from Earth.

History of Space Exploration

On March 2nd, 1972, Pioneer 10 is launched on its unmanned journey to travel through the asteroid belt and make direct observations of Jupiter, passing the gas planet in December 1973. Pioneer 10 was both the first craft to successfully maneuver through the asteroid belt and, by most definitions, leave the solar system. However, in January of 2003, it ceased to send further communications, while 7.6 billion miles from Earth.

Thermographic Photography 
Revealing insulation inefficiencies in everyday objects (via)

  1. Plugs still use power even when their attached appliances are turned off, as indicated by the red glow of these adapter plugs. Studies have even indicated that in one year, a plug wastes as much energy when plugged in, yet off, as it uses to power its intended functions.
  2. Nowadays it may be less of an environmental impact to stand aimlessly at your fridge, as in the last 30 years, fridges have become a third more efficient.
  3. New energy-efficient lightbulbs, including the Geobulb II and compact fluorescent bulbs, require only a fourth as much electricity as traditional incandescent bulbs. Even with their red appearances, these bulbs are both much cooler than incandescent bulbs, which end up wasting 90% of their energy as heat. 
  4. Red and yellow patches show escaping heat, and thus wasted energy, in a older home. Luckily, new double-pane window effectively seal in warmth, thus appear cool blue and extensively cutting heating costs.
  5. The engines in our vehicles are actually rather inefficient, as they waste up to 85% of the energy, mostly as heat.
video platform video management video solutions video player

Scientists and engineers have been fascinated with spider silk’s amazing and unimaginable capabilities, as it is one of the toughest, yet most delicate materials in existence. The latest use has been in a bow of a violin, enabling musicians to play profoundly soft and versatile melodies.

theatlantic:

At the Restaurant of the Future, This Gadget Could Replace Your Waiter

With no instructions, I order the two items through the Presto. Beautifully lit photos let me see what I’m going to get. The UI is intuitive. Within 20 seconds, I’ve sent my order to the kitchen. Before we’d even finished eating, I swiped my card slightly awkwardly into the built-in payment slot, added a tip, and settled up. I would not say that this machine will blow your mind with its technical capabilities, but that’s exactly the point: It just works. 
I cannot say for sure that this will be The Future of your restaurant experience, but after talking with E la Carte co-founder Rajat Suri, I’m convinced that some sort of automated ordering system will make its way into your dining experiences. And it’s not because the technology is cool or whizbang or will draw customers. The real reasons are completely economic.
“It costs about a dollar a day per table, it can even go lower depending on if you have sponsors involved because all the alcohol companies want to get involved,” Suri says. “For that, they get about $6 a day per tablet in increased sales. That’s extra desserts, appetizers, drinks. They get about another $5 in extra table turns. If you can fit in one more table per night, that’s worth a lot of money. And some restaurants, though not Calafia, get about $4, $5 extra because they choose to save labor.”
Read more.


As a waitress, I say screw that. As a customer, I say FINALLY.

theatlantic:

At the Restaurant of the Future, This Gadget Could Replace Your Waiter

With no instructions, I order the two items through the Presto. Beautifully lit photos let me see what I’m going to get. The UI is intuitive. Within 20 seconds, I’ve sent my order to the kitchen. Before we’d even finished eating, I swiped my card slightly awkwardly into the built-in payment slot, added a tip, and settled up. I would not say that this machine will blow your mind with its technical capabilities, but that’s exactly the point: It just works. 

I cannot say for sure that this will be The Future of your restaurant experience, but after talking with E la Carte co-founder Rajat Suri, I’m convinced that some sort of automated ordering system will make its way into your dining experiences. And it’s not because the technology is cool or whizbang or will draw customers. The real reasons are completely economic.

“It costs about a dollar a day per table, it can even go lower depending on if you have sponsors involved because all the alcohol companies want to get involved,” Suri says. “For that, they get about $6 a day per tablet in increased sales. That’s extra desserts, appetizers, drinks. They get about another $5 in extra table turns. If you can fit in one more table per night, that’s worth a lot of money. And some restaurants, though not Calafia, get about $4, $5 extra because they choose to save labor.”

Read more.

As a waitress, I say screw that. As a customer, I say FINALLY.

Speech-Jamming Gun That Can Silence Mid-Sentence
We all have that one friend who just doesn’t know when to shut up. Doesn’t it make you want to shoot them with a gun that scrambles their thoughts, thereby preventing speech? Well, Japanese inventors have a product to offer!
Researchers have manufactured a “SpeechJammer” that allows you to silence people up to 30 meters away, without an instance of pain. Developed by Kazutaka Kurihara of the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology and Koji Tsukada of Ochanomizu University, this device records the target’s speech and fires their own vernacular back at them with a delay just long enough that it affects the brain’s cognitive processes, causing speakers to stutter before finally silencing them.
Though the device works best on those who are reading aloud, it has been suggested that this could be utilized in such every-day scenarios as avoiding interruptions or chatty-Cathys in the library. Or maybe even superfluous politicians? 

Speech-Jamming Gun That Can Silence Mid-Sentence

We all have that one friend who just doesn’t know when to shut up. Doesn’t it make you want to shoot them with a gun that scrambles their thoughts, thereby preventing speech? Well, Japanese inventors have a product to offer!

Researchers have manufactured a “SpeechJammer” that allows you to silence people up to 30 meters away, without an instance of pain. Developed by Kazutaka Kurihara of the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology and Koji Tsukada of Ochanomizu University, this device records the target’s speech and fires their own vernacular back at them with a delay just long enough that it affects the brain’s cognitive processes, causing speakers to stutter before finally silencing them.

Though the device works best on those who are reading aloud, it has been suggested that this could be utilized in such every-day scenarios as avoiding interruptions or chatty-Cathys in the library. Or maybe even superfluous politicians?