relright:

natural swimming pools

uses plants to filter the water instead of chemicals

History of Space Exploration
This is the Saturn V rocket during a test flight on November 9th, 1967. After passing these trials, the rocket was used to propel the next Apollo spacecraft from the Earth’s atmosphere. 

History of Space Exploration

This is the Saturn V rocket during a test flight on November 9th, 1967. After passing these trials, the rocket was used to propel the next Apollo spacecraft from the Earth’s atmosphere. 

Stunning images of one of the many solar farms on Spain’s Iberian Peninsula.
More images and information here

Doomsday Seed Vault in Norway. This week is a big week for this particular doomsday vault, as it is scheduled to receive almost 25,000 additional seed samples from all over the globe. (via)

Doomsday Seed Vault in Norway. This week is a big week for this particular doomsday vault, as it is scheduled to receive almost 25,000 additional seed samples from all over the globe. (via)

Pictured above is a picture from a visualization from the Advanced Visualization Laboratory’s planetarium film “Dynamic Earth”. The film investigates the inner workings of these powerful natural forces by basing its visualizations off satellite monitoring data and advanced supercomputing simulations. It explores the workings of Earth’s climate, following a trail of energy that flows from the sun into the atmosphere, oceans and the biosphere. (via)

Pictured above is a picture from a visualization from the Advanced Visualization Laboratory’s planetarium film “Dynamic Earth”. The film investigates the inner workings of these powerful natural forces by basing its visualizations off satellite monitoring data and advanced supercomputing simulations. It explores the workings of Earth’s climate, following a trail of energy that flows from the sun into the atmosphere, oceans and the biosphere. (via)

This material is the darkest known substance in existence, absorbing 99.9% of the light it comes into contact with. Made when carbon nanotubes are tacked on their ends and compressed together, microscopically the surface is rough and uneven, effectively breaking up the light and inhibiting its ability to reflect light. In certain arrangements, these carbon nanotubes can acts superconductors, which makes them even better at absorbing light.
And, of course, with extremes comes potential use, as scientists believe that this substance could be used to improve telescopes and more efficient solar collectors, because virtually no light is wasted.  (via)

This material is the darkest known substance in existence, absorbing 99.9% of the light it comes into contact with. Made when carbon nanotubes are tacked on their ends and compressed together, microscopically the surface is rough and uneven, effectively breaking up the light and inhibiting its ability to reflect light. In certain arrangements, these carbon nanotubes can acts superconductors, which makes them even better at absorbing light.

And, of course, with extremes comes potential use, as scientists believe that this substance could be used to improve telescopes and more efficient solar collectors, because virtually no light is wasted.  (via)

Skin Cultures
Once upon a time, when a patient required suffered from severe burns, surgeons would be forced to graft pigskin as temporary bandage of sorts. But with modern technologies, we have the ability to remove human skin from alternate locations of the body and even use substitutes engineered through either synthetic means or from collagen of certain animals, such as sharks or cows. 

Skin Cultures

Once upon a time, when a patient required suffered from severe burns, surgeons would be forced to graft pigskin as temporary bandage of sorts. But with modern technologies, we have the ability to remove human skin from alternate locations of the body and even use substitutes engineered through either synthetic means or from collagen of certain animals, such as sharks or cows. 

This bizarre cube is the Cryoscope Haptic Weathervane, created by Robb Godshaw of Syyn Labs. Basically its sole purpose is to provide another way to accurately determine the temperature outside, without attempting to decode degrees or heading outdoors. It has an Arduino processor inside which raises or lowers the temperature of the surface of the cube to the precise temperature of the outside air. Now you can decide what to wear just as easily as you can hit the snooze button from your bed! (via)

This bizarre cube is the Cryoscope Haptic Weathervane, created by Robb Godshaw of Syyn Labs. Basically its sole purpose is to provide another way to accurately determine the temperature outside, without attempting to decode degrees or heading outdoors. It has an Arduino processor inside which raises or lowers the temperature of the surface of the cube to the precise temperature of the outside air. Now you can decide what to wear just as easily as you can hit the snooze button from your bed! (via)

The weave of a nylon stocking. (via)

The weave of a nylon stocking. 
(via)

Frozen Fruit Fly’s Potential
 
Scientists in Czech Republic have recently thawed a fruit fly which had been frozen the year before while pupating. During this year, the drosophila melanogaster was preserved through several generations at temperatures of 23˚C.
 
One of the possible side-effects scientists were testing for included the fruit fly’s ability to develop and mate post-freeze. Luckily, the fly has been able to both successfully metamorph and mate to produce healthy offspring.
Only a few insects can tolerate freezing, as the accumulation of ice crystals in most vertebrates’ bodies is either very harmful or fatal. Vladimír Koštál and his team of researchers have reported that these flies can survive being frozen, but require a diet of cryoperservatives and  amino acids from close evolutionary relatives native to the Arctic.  
Implications of this study, if further tested could lead to the better understanding of genes’ underlying susceptibility to cold. By singling-out how some organisms are able to thrive in cold could help researchers understand how humans could, in order to help organs survive on ice for longer periods so they can be transplanted. In addition, this could prove useful for entomologists, as they could preserve whole organisms for study rather than acquiring whole gene pools.

Frozen Fruit Fly’s Potential

Scientists in Czech Republic have recently thawed a fruit fly which had been frozen the year before while pupating. During this year, the drosophila melanogaster was preserved through several generations at temperatures of 23˚C.

One of the possible side-effects scientists were testing for included the fruit fly’s ability to develop and mate post-freeze. Luckily, the fly has been able to both successfully metamorph and mate to produce healthy offspring.

Only a few insects can tolerate freezing, as the accumulation of ice crystals in most vertebrates’ bodies is either very harmful or fatal. Vladimír Koštál and his team of researchers have reported that these flies can survive being frozen, but require a diet of cryoperservatives and  amino acids from close evolutionary relatives native to the Arctic. 

Implications of this study, if further tested could lead to the better understanding of genes’ underlying susceptibility to cold. By singling-out how some organisms are able to thrive in cold could help researchers understand how humans could, in order to help organs survive on ice for longer periods so they can be transplanted. In addition, this could prove useful for entomologists, as they could preserve whole organisms for study rather than acquiring whole gene pools.

Could BioPrinters replace the organ transplant waiting list?

Thank you xradicald for sharing this with me!

Thermal Imaging Reveals Elephants’ Secret to Keeping Cool

During the day, these large land mammals have a very consistent overall temperature and cool themselves off by tossing mud onto their backs. However, these images revealed that at night, the elephant’s temperature range was radically different, with the mud still very effectively keeping the back cool. Their trunks and eyes possess and radiate the most heat, while their ears stope giving off heat completely. Zoologists are grateful for the study, as the new information could help determine whether elephants in captivity should spend the nights indoors.

Paper Robots with a Strong, Gentle Touch

Paper structures built using the principles of origami could lead to cheap, easy-to-make robots that are very different than their more traditional metal brethren.
George Whitesides and colleagues at Harvard University have previously built squid-inspired robots with artificial muscles made from soft plastic and powered by pneumatic air pumps. Now they have combined this technique with paper to create a series of lightweight structures capable of bending, twisting and even lifting heavy weights.
Paper is flexible, but unlike plastic it does not stretch, making it useful for forming rigid structures when a paper balloon is filled with air. For example, paper folded into a bellows-like shape embedded in flexible plastic extends straight upwards when inflated, creating a 1-centimetre-wide tube weighing just over 8 grams that is able to lift a 1 kilogram weight. Gluing different parts of the bellows together lets it inflate into a U shape or twist as it extends.
These simple designs could be improved upon to create “soft” robots able to work closely with humans, unlike some robots currently used on factory assembly lines. The team says they could be used to provide extra hands for surgeons or handle delicate objects such as eggs or fruit.

Paper Robots with a Strong, Gentle Touch

Paper structures built using the principles of origami could lead to cheap, easy-to-make robots that are very different than their more traditional metal brethren.

George Whitesides and colleagues at Harvard University have previously built squid-inspired robots with artificial muscles made from soft plastic and powered by pneumatic air pumps. Now they have combined this technique with paper to create a series of lightweight structures capable of bending, twisting and even lifting heavy weights.

Paper is flexible, but unlike plastic it does not stretch, making it useful for forming rigid structures when a paper balloon is filled with air. For example, paper folded into a bellows-like shape embedded in flexible plastic extends straight upwards when inflated, creating a 1-centimetre-wide tube weighing just over 8 grams that is able to lift a 1 kilogram weight. Gluing different parts of the bellows together lets it inflate into a U shape or twist as it extends.

These simple designs could be improved upon to create “soft” robots able to work closely with humans, unlike some robots currently used on factory assembly lines. The team says they could be used to provide extra hands for surgeons or handle delicate objects such as eggs or fruit.

3D Images of Earthquakes, Before and After

Laser scans of Earth’s land surface taken from aircraft have now yielded the most comprehensive before-and-after picture of an earthquake yet, scientists revealed today.

These kinds of scans before and after large quakes may help reveal where exactly the quakes ruptured the Earth down to a scale of just a few inches, which may help experts prepare for the hazards of such quakes, researchers said.

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